WordPress.org News

Quarterly Updates | Q3 2018

To keep everyone aware of big projects and efforts across WordPress contributor teams, I’ve reached out to each team’s listed representatives. I asked each of them to share their Top Priority (and when they hope for it to be completed), as well as their biggest Wins and Worries. Have questions? I’ve included a link to each team’s site in the headings. Accessibility Contacted: @joedolson, @audrasjb, @arush Priority: Work on authoring a manual for assistive technology users on Gutenberg, led by Claire Brotherton (@abrightclearweb). Continue to work on improving the overall user experience in Gutenberg. Update and organize the WP A11y handbook. Struggle: Lack of developers and accessibility experts to help test and code the milestone issues. Still over 100 outstanding issues, and developing the Gutenberg AT manual helps expose additional issues. The announcement of an accessibility focus on 4.9.9 derailed our planning for Gutenberg in September with minimal productivity, as that goal was quickly withdrawn from the schedule. Big Win: Getting focus constraint implemented in popovers and similar components in Gutenberg. CLI Contacted: @danielbachhuber, @schlessera Priority: Current priority is v2.1.0 of WP-CLI, to polish the major refactoring v2.0.0 introduced. You can join in or follow progress on their site. Struggle: Getting enough contributors to make peer-review possible/manageable. Big Win: The major refactoring of v2 was mostly without any negative impacts on existing installs. It provided substantial improvements to maintainability including: faster and more reliable testing, more straight-forward changes to individual packages, and simpler contributor on-boarding. Community Contacted: @francina, @hlashbrooke Priority: Supporting contributors of all levels via: monthly WordCamp Organizers chat, better onboarding with a translated welcome pack, and Contribution Drive documentation. Struggle: Fewer contributors than usual. Big Win: Meetup Vetting Sprint!  Core Contacted: @jeffpaul Priority: Continued preparation for the 5.0 release cycle and Gutenberg. Struggle: Identifying tasks for first time contributors, as well as for new-to-JS contributors. Design Contacted: @melchoyce, @karmatosed, @boemedia, @joshuawold, @mizejewski Priority: Preparing for WordPress 5.0 and continuing to work on better onboarding practices. Struggle: Identifying tasks for contributor days, especially for small- to medium-sized tasks that can be fit into a single day. Big Win: Regular contributions are starting to build up. Documentation Contacted: @kenshino Priority: Getting HelpHub out before WordPress 5.0’s launch to make sure Gutenberg User Docs have a permanent position to reside Struggle: Getting the documentation from HelpHub into WordPress.org/support is more manual than initially anticipated. Big Win: Had a good discussion with the Gutenberg team about their docs and how WordPress.org expects documentation to be distributed (via DevHub, Make and HelpHub). Getting past the code blocks to release HelpHub (soon) Hosting Contacted: @mikeschroder, @jadonn Priority: Helping Gutenberg land well at hosts for users in 5.0. Struggle: Short time frame with few resources to accomplish priority items. Big Win: Preparing Try Gutenberg support guide for hosts during the rollout and good reception from users following it. Marketing Contacted: @bridgetwillard Priority: Continuing to write and publish case studies from the community. Big Win: Onboarding guide is going well and is currently being translated. Meta (WordPress.org Site) Contacted: @tellyworth, @coffee2code Priority: Support for other teams in the lead up to, and the follow-up of, the release of WP 5.0. ETA is the WP 5.0 release date (Nov 19) and thereafter, unless it gets bumped to next quarter. Struggle: Maintaining momentum on tickets (still). Big Win: Launch of front-end demo of Gutenberg on https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ Mobile Contacted: @elibud Priority: Have an alpha version of Gutenberg in the WordPress apps, ETA end of year 2018. Struggle: Unfamiliar tech stack and the goal of reusing as much of Gutenberg-web’s code as possible. Big Win: Running mobile tests on web’s PRs. Plugins Contacted: @ipstenu Priority: Cleaning up ‘inactive’ users, which was supposed to be complete but some work preparing for 5.0 was necessary. Struggles: Devnotes are lacking for the upcoming release which slows progress. Big Win: No backlog even though a lot were out! Polyglots Contacted: @petya, @ocean90, @nao, @chantalc, @deconf, @casiepa Priority: Help re-activating inactive locale teams. Struggle: Many GTEs are having a hard time keeping up with incoming translation validation and PTE requests. Big Win: Made some progress in locale research and reassigning new GTEs. Support Contacted: @clorith Priority: Preparing for the upcoming 5.0 release Struggle: Finding a good balance between how much we want to help people and how much we are able to help people. Also, contributor recruitment (always a crowd favorite!) Big Win: How well the team, on a global level, has managed to maintain a good flow of user engagement through support. Theme Review Contacted: @acosmin, @rabmalin, @thinkupthemes, @williampatton Priority: Implementing the Theme Sniffer plugin on WordPress.org which is one step forward towards automation. ETA early 2019 Struggle: Not having so many contributors/reviewers. Big Win: Implementing multiple requirements into our review flow, like screenshots and readme.txt requirements. Training Contacted: @bethsoderberg, @juliek Priority: Getting the learn.wordpress.org site designed, developed, and being able to publish lesson plans to it. Struggle: Getting contributors onboard and continually contributing. Part of that is related to the learn.wordpress.org site. People like to see their contributions. Big Win: We have our new workflow and tools in place. We are also streamlining that process to help things go from idea to publication more quickly. Interested in updates from the last quarter? You can find those here: https://wordpress.org/news/2018/07/quarterly-updates-q2-2018/

The Month in WordPress: October 2018

Teams across the WordPress project are working hard to make sure everything is ready for the upcoming release of WordPress 5.0. Find out what’s going on and how you can get involved. The Plan for WordPress 5.0 Early this month, the planned release schedule was announced for WordPress 5.0, which was updated a few weeks later. WordPress 5.0 is a highly anticipated release, as it’s the official  launch of Gutenberg — the new block editor for WordPress Core. For more detail, check out this  granular timeline. Along with the planned release schedule, @matt, who is heading up this release, announced leads for critical focuses on the project, including @matveb, @karmatosed, @laurelfulford, @allancole, @lonelyvegan, @omarreiss, @antpb, @pento, @chanthaboune, @danielbachhuber, and @mcsf. WordPress 5.0 is currently in its second beta phase and will soon move to the release candidate status. Help test this release right now by installing the WordPress Beta Tester plugin on your site. Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. You can also help out by testing or translating the release into a local language. New Editor for WordPress Core Active development continues on Gutenberg, the new editing experience for WordPress Core. The latest release is feature complete, meaning that all further development on it will be to improve existing features and fix outstanding bugs. Some have raised concerns about Gutenberg’s accessibility, prompting the development team to detail some areas in which the new editor is accessible. To help improve things further, the team has made a public call for accessibility testers to assist. Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the Gutenberg tag on the Core team blog and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Read this guide to find areas where you can have the most impact. Migrating HelpHub to WordPress.org HelpHub is an ongoing project to move all of WordPress’ user documentation from the Codex to the WordPress Support portal. HelpHub has been developed on a separate staging server and it’s now time to migrate the new documentation to its home on WordPress.org. The plan is to have everything moved over  before WordPress 5.0 is released, so that all the new documentation will be available on the new platform from the start. The HelpHub team has published a call for volunteers to help with the migration. If you would like to get involved, join the #docs channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and contact @atachibana to get started. A New Default Theme for WordPress A brand new default theme — Twenty Nineteen — has been announced with development being led by @allancole. The theme is packaged with WordPress 5.0, so it will be following the same release schedule as Core. The new theme is designed to integrate seamlessly with Gutenberg and showcase how you can build a theme alongside the new block editor and take advantage of the creative freedom that it offers. Want to help build Twenty Nineteen? Join in on the theme’s GitHub repo and join the #core-themes channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Further Reading: The Support team are putting together more formal Support Guidelines for the WordPress Support Forums.The group focused on privacy tools in Core has released some details on the work they have been doing recently, with a roadmap for their plans over the next few months.The Core team released an update about how WordPress will be compatible with PHP 7.3.The Theme Review Team have published some new requirements regarding child themes, readme files and trusted authors in the Theme Directory.The WordCamp Europe team are working on a PWA service for all WordCamp websites. If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

WordPress 5.0 Beta 2

WordPress 5.0 Beta 2 is now available! This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version. There are two ways to test the WordPress 5.0 Beta: try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”), or you can download the beta here (zip). WordPress 5.0 is slated for release on November 19, and we need your help to get there. Here are some of the big issues that we fixed since Beta 1: Block Editor We’ve updated to the latest version of the block editor from the Gutenberg plugin, which includes the new Format API, embedding improvements, and a variety of bug fixes. Meta boxes had a few bugs, and they weren’t showing at all in the block editor, so we’ve fixed and polished there. Internationalisation We’ve added support for registering and loading JavaScript translation files. Twenty Nineteen The Twenty Nineteen repository is a hive of activity, there have been a stack of minor bugs clean up, and some notable additions: There’s now a widget area in the page footer.Navigation submenus have been implemented for mobile devices.Customiser options have been added for changing the theme colours and feature image filters. Everything Else The REST API has a couple of bug fixes and performance improvements. PHP 7.3 compatibility has been improved. We’re fixing the bugs:All the ones you’ve reported.Some that we’ve found, too.

The Month in WordPress: September 2018

The new WordPress editor continues to be a major focus for all WordPress contribution teams. Read on to find out some more about their work, as well as everything else that has been happening around the community this past month. Further Enhancements to the New WordPress Editor Active development continues on Gutenberg, the new editing experience for WordPress Core. The latest update for the editor includes great new features, such as reusable content blocks, a dark editor style, export and import of templates, and much more. In addition, the Gutenberg team has published a comprehensive guide to the features currently included in the editor. Users can test Gutenberg right now by installing the plugin, which currently has over 450,000 active installs according to the new Gutenberg in Numbers site. Along with that, the Gutenberg Handbook has some very useful information about how to use and develop for the new editor. Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the #gutenberg tag on the Core team blog and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Work Begins on WordPress 5.0 After initially announcing a minor v4.9.9 release, the Core team has shifted their focus to the next major release — v5.0. One of the primary factors for this change is that Gutenberg is nearly ready to be considered for merging into Core, with the goal to complete the merge in v5.0. To maintain flexibility in the development process the final timelines are not yet determined, allowing work already done for v4.9.9 to be moved to v5.0 if needed. Ensuring that WordPress is compatible with the upcoming PHP 7.3 release is a high priority for the Core team. Once a final decision is made, the details will be announced on the Core team blog. Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Further Reading: The Community Team has some great updates on the progress of the current WordCamp Incubator Program.A team inside the Drupal community is working on integrating Gutenberg into their CMS.There is a current discussion among community organizers about plans to increase the maximum ticket price for WordCamps.The Mobile Team is looking for people to grow the beta program for testing the iOS and Android mobile apps.The Diversity Outreach Speaker Training group is looking for feedback on their document to assist WordPress Meetups and WordCamps in building diverse speaker rosters.The Theme Team has updated their rules regarding sponsored and affiliate links inside themes added to the Theme Directory.Meetup organizers are now able to receive a WordPress.org profile badge for their community work. If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: August 2018

Many of the WordPress contribution teams have been working hard on the new WordPress editor, and the tools, services, and documentation surrounding it. Read on to find out more about this ongoing project, as well as everything else that has been happening around the WordPress community in August. WordPress 4.9.8 is Released WordPress 4.9.8 was released at the beginning of the month. While this was a maintenance release fixing 46 bugs, it was significant for Core development because it made a point of highlighting Gutenberg — the new WordPress editor that is currently in development (more on that below). This release also included some important updates to the privacy tools that were added to Core earlier this year. Want to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. New WordPress Editor Development Continues Active development continues on Gutenberg, the new editing experience for WordPress Core. The latest version features a number of important user experience improvements, including a new unified toolbar and support for a more focussed writing mode. Users can test Gutenberg right now by installing the plugin, which currently has nearly 300,000 active installs. Along with that, the Gutenberg Handbook has some very useful information about how to use and develop for the new editor. Want to get involved in building Gutenberg? Follow the #gutenberg tag on the Core team blog and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Planning Begins for the Next Global WordPress Translation Day The Global WordPress Translation Day is a 24-hour event held online and all across the world. It is designed to bring communities together to translate WordPress into their local languages, and to help them connect with other communities doing the same thing. There have been three Translation Days since April 2016, and the fourth edition is in the planning stages now. The Polyglots team, who organizes these events, is currently looking for input on the date, format, and content for the event and would love some feedback from the community. Want to get involved in translating WordPress into your own language? Follow the Polyglots team blog and join the #polyglots channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Further Reading: The Update PHP page on WordPress.org has been revised and improved to make the reasons for upgrading more clear.The Mobile team is looking for people to help test the latest versions of the Android and iOS apps for WordPress.WordBits is a innovative new platform for publishing WordPress-based code snippets with the ability to download each snippet as a working plugin.The Community Team has some updates about how things are going with this year’s WordCamp Incubator program.The WordPress Support Forums now include a feature allowing forum volunteers to easily report a post to the moderators for a follow-up.WordCamp Kochi, India has unfortunately had to postpone their event due to floods in the region.WP Glossary is a new site that offers helpful definitions of words that you could encounter when using WordPress.A few WordPress community members have started a working group to tackle the idea of building diverse WordPress  communities all across the world.A new Gutenberg Block Library is available, listing the details of the many blocks available for the new editor. If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

WordPress 4.9.8 Maintenance Release

We are pleased to announce the immediate availability of WordPress 4.9.8.  This maintenance release fixes 46 bugs, enhancements and blessed tasks, including updating the Twenty Seventeen bundled theme. Following are the highlights of what is now available. “Try Gutenberg” callout Most users will now be presented with a notice in their WordPress dashboard. This “Try Gutenberg” is an opportunity for users to use the Gutenberg block editor before it is released in WordPress 5.0. In WordPress 4.9.8, the callout will be shown to the following users: If Gutenberg is not installed or activated, the callout will be shown to Admin users on single sites, and Super Admin users on multisites. If Gutenberg is installed and activated, the callout will be shown to Contributor users and above. If the Classic Editor plugin is installed and activated, the callout will be hidden for all users. You can learn more by reading  “Try Gutenberg” Callout in WordPress 4.9.8. Privacy fixes/enhancements This release includes 18 Privacy fixes focused on ensuring consistency and flexibility in the new personal data tools that were added in 4.9.6, including: The type of request being confirmed is now included in the subject line for all privacy confirmation emails. Improved consistency with site name being used for privacy emails in multisite. Pagination for Privacy request admin screens can now be adjusted. Increased the test coverage for several core privacy functions. This post has more information about all of the issues fixed in 4.9.8 if you’d like to learn more. Download WordPress 4.9.8 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically. Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.8: 1naveengiri, Aaron D. Campbell, Aaron Jorbin, Abdullah Ramzan, alejandroxlopez, Allen Snook, Andrea Fercia, Andrew Ozz, Andrew Taylor, Arun, Ayesh Karunaratne, Birgir Erlendsson (birgire), Birgit Pauli-Haack, BjornW, Boone Gorges, Brandon Kraft, Burhan Nasir, Chetan Prajapati, Chris Lema, Corey McKrill, Daniel Bachhuber, Daniel James, David Herrera, Dion Hulse, Dominik Schilling (ocean90), dontstealmyfish, dyrer, Felipe Elia, Felix Arntz, Fernando Claussen, Gareth, Garrett Hyder, Gary Pendergast, Gennady Kovshenin, GM_Alex, Heather Burns, Ian Dunn, ibelanger, imath, Jb Audras, Jeremy Pry, JJJ, Joe McGill, Joen Asmussen, John Blackbourn, Jonathan Desrosiers, Jonny Harris, Josepha, JoshuaWold, Joy, jrf, K. Adam White, khaihong, kjellr, Konstantinos Xenos, laurelfulford, lbenicio, Leander Iversen, leemon, macbookandrew, Marius L. J., Matias Ventura, Mel Choyce, mensmaximus, mermel, metalandcoffee, michelleweber, Milan Dinić, Muhammad Kashif, Naoko Takano, Nathan Johnson, Ov3rfly, palmiak, Paul Biron, Prashant Baldha, PressTigers, programmin, Rafsun Chowdhury, redcastor, Robin Cornett, Sergey Biryukov, Simon Prosser, skoldin, spyderbytes, Subrata Sarkar, Sébastien SERRE, Tammie Lister, tharsheblows, Thomas Patrick Levy, timbowesohft, Timothy Jacobs, Tobias Zimpel, Tor-Bjorn Fjellner, Towhidul Islam, Usman Khalid, warmlaundry, William Earnhardt, Yui, and YuriV.

The Month in WordPress: July 2018

With WordPress 5.0 coming closer, there’s lots of work going on all across the project. Read on to learn about how we progressed in July. Release of WordPress 4.9.7 On July 5, WordPress 4.9.7 was released,  fixing one security issue and 17 other bugs across the platform. While this is a minor release, incremental fixes are essential to keep WordPress running smoothly. Everyone is encouraged to update as soon as possible and to make sure that automatic updates are switched on. Would you like to get involved in building WordPress Core? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. The New WordPress Editor In the upcoming minor release of WordPress, 4.9.8, a new section in the dashboard will feature Gutenberg, the upcoming content editor for WordPress. While the official release of Gutenberg is scheduled for the coming months, you can already install it as a plugin to test it out right now. Additionally, a brand new demo page is now available — play around with the many features the editor has to offer, without installing it on your own site. Would you like to help build or test Gutenberg? Follow the Core team blog and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Page Design Updates on WordPress.org Bit by bit we’re refreshing the design of WordPress.org. The latest pages to get a new treatment have been the Download page and user profiles. The Meta and Design teams worked hard to make these new designs a reality, with notable contributions from @melchoyce, @obenland, @mapk, and @kjellr. The new designs enhance the overall look of the site and provide more relevant information to those searching. Would you like to get involved in the design refresh? Follow the Meta and Design team blogs and join the #meta and #design channels in the Making WordPress Slack group. The First WP-CLI Hack Day On Friday July 20, the WP-CLI team held their first hack day — a global event encouraging people to contribute to the official command line tool for WordPress. Run by @schlessera, the event  was a great success. Twelve pull requests were  merged and another 13 submitted. It also included a video chat to give all contributors a space to meet each other and connect directly. Would  you like to get involved in contributing to WP-CLI? Follow the team blog and join the #cli channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Further Reading: The WordPress Foundation is looking for local community organizers to run introductory open-source workshops in 2018.@chanthaboune compiled updates for the last quarter from the contribution teams all across the WordPress project.In a great move for internationalization, the WordPress Mobile Apps now support right-to-left languages.WordCamp events can now accept payment via Stripe — PayPal remains an alternative option.The WP-CLI team will soon release v2.0 of the official WordPress command line tool.The Fields API project in WordPress Core is looking for a new lead to drive it forward.In WordPress 4.9.8, it will  be possible for developers to fully register the meta fields used by their plugins and themes.After many years of hard work, v1.0.0 of the WordPress Coding Standards for PHP_CodeSniffer has been released.The Mobile team is looking for people to help test v10.6 of WordPress for iOS. If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

Quarterly Updates | Q2 2018

To keep everyone aware of big projects and efforts across WordPress contributor teams, I’ve reached out to each team’s listed representatives. I asked each of them to share their Top Priority (and when they hope for it to be completed), as well as their biggest Wins and Worries. Have questions? I’ve included a link to each team’s site in the headings. Accessibility Contacted: @rianrietveld, @joedolson, @afercia Priority: Working to make sure that Gutenberg is reasonably accessible prior to merge. ETA is before 5.0 Struggle: Lack of developers and accessibility experts to help test and code the milestone issues. The team is doing outreach to help solve this problem. Big Win: Interest from companies like The Paciello Group and Tenon.io to help out with Gutenberg code review and testing tools. CLI Contacted: @danielbachhuber, @schlessera Priority: Very first global Hack Day is coming up July 20. Version 2.0.0 is still in progress (new ETA is end of July). Struggle: The team continues to need new contributors. The current team is tiny but tough. Big Win: WP-CLI is currently one of the project’s four main focuses, as mentioned in the Summer Update at WordCamp Europe. Community Contacted: @francina, @hlashbrooke Priority: Focusing on smoothing out the processes in our community management by building up our team of volunteers and establishing what tools we need to keep things running well. ETA is ongoing. Struggle: Our two biggest struggles at the moment are tracking what we need to get done, and making final decisions on things. There is current work on the tools available to assist with tracking progress. Big Win: After making a concerted effort to get more contributors on the Community Team, we now have a much larger group of volunteers working as deputies and WordCamp mentors Core Contacted: @jeffpaul Priority: Following the WordCamp Europe summer update (and the companion post here), the team is getting Gutenberg (the new WordPress editing experience) into a strong state for the 5.0 release. Potential ETA as soon as August. Struggle: Coordinating momentum and direction as we start seeing more contributors offering their time. Still working our way through open issues. The team is starting multiple bug scrubs each week to work through these more quickly and transparently. Big Win: Had a sizable release in 4.9.6 which featured major updates around privacy tools and functionality in Core. Design Contacted: @melchoyce, @karmatosed, @boemedia, @joshuawold, @mizejewski Priority: Better on-boarding of new contributors, especially creating better documentation. ETA is end of July. Struggle: It’s hard to identify reasonably small tasks for first-time contributors. Big Win: The team is much more organized now which has helped clear out the design backlog, bring in new contributors, and also keep current contributors coming back. Bonus: Joshua Wold will co-lead the upcoming release. Documentation Contacted: @kenshino Priority: Opening up the work on HelpHub to new contributors and easing the onboarding process. No ETA. Struggle: Some blockers with making sure the code and database can be ready to launch on https://wordpress.org/support/ Big Win: The first phase of HelpHub creation is complete, which means content updates (current info, more readable, easier discovery), internal search, design improvements, and REST API endpoints. Hosting Contacted: @mikeschroder, @jadonn Priority: Preparing hosts for supporting Gutenberg, especially support questions they’re likely to see when the “Try Gutenberg” callout is released. ETA July 31st, then before WordPress 5.0 Struggle: Most contributions are still made a by a small team of volunteers. Seeing a few more people join, but progress is slow. Big Win: New team members and hosting companies have joined the #hosting-community team and have started contributing. Marketing Contacted: @bridgetwillard Priority: Continuing to write and publish case studies from the community. ETA is ongoing. Struggle: No current team struggles. Big Win: Wrote and designed a short Contributor Day onboarding card. It was used at Contributor Day at WCEU and onboarding time went down to 1 hour instead of 3 hours. Meta (WordPress.org Site) Contacted: @tellyworth, @coffee2code Priority: Reducing manual work around the contributor space (theme review, GDPR/privacy, plugin review). ETA for small wins is end of quarter, larger efforts after that. Struggle: Maintaining momentum on tickets. There are also some discussions about updating the ticket management process across teams that use the Meta trac system. Big Win: The new About page launched and has been translated across most locale sites. Mobile Contacted: @elibud Priority: Getting Gutenberg in the mobile applications. ETA is late December. Struggle: Consuming the Gutenberg source in the ReactNative app directly. More info can be found here: https://make.wordpress.org/mobile/2018/07/09/next-steps-for-gutenberg-mobile/ Big Win: The WordPress mobile applications now fully support right-to-left languages and are compliant with the latest standards for accessibility. Plugins Contacted: @ipstenu Priority: Clearing ~8,000 unused plugins from the queues. Likely ETA is September. Struggles: Had to triage a lot of false claims around plugins offering GDPR compliance. Big Win: Released 4.9.6 and updated expectations with plugin authors. Huge thanks to the Core Privacy team for their hard work on this. Polyglots Contacted: @petya, @ocean90, @nao, @chantalc, @deconf, @casiepa Priority: Keep WordPress releases translated to 100% and then concentrate on the top 100 plugins and themes. ETA is ongoing. Struggle: Getting new PTEs fast enough, and complex tools/systems. Overall, the volume of strings awaiting approval. Support Contacted: @clorith Priority: Getting ready for the Gutenberg callout (it got pushed last quarter). Needing a better presence on the official support forums, and outreach for that is underway, ETA end of July.  Struggle: Keeping contributors participating post-contributor days/drives. Considering the creation of a dedicated post-contributor day survey to get some insight here. Big Win: The increase in international liaisons joining for weekly meetings, helping bring the wider support community together. Theme Review Contacted: @acosmin, @rabmalin, @thinkupthemes, @williampatton Priority: Building a better Theme Check/Sniffer in order to automate most of the checks done right now by reviewers. ETA late 2018, early 2019. Struggle: Bringing in new contributors to the team. Big Win: Trusted Authors program Tide Contacted: @valendesigns (but usually @jeffpaul) Priority: Storing PHPCompatibilty results inside the WordPress.org API and building a UI to display those results, an endpoint to request an audit is required for this work to continue. Struggle: Development has dramatically slowed down while team members are on leave or pulled into internal client work. Big Win: Migration to Google Cloud Platform (GCP) from Amazon Web Services (AWS) is complete and the audit servers have all been rewritten in Go. (This allows us to be faster with greater capacity and less cost.) Training Contacted: @bethsoderberg, @juliek Priority: Lesson plan production. ETA is ongoing. Struggle: The workflow is a little complex, so recruiting and training enough contributors to keep the process moving is a struggle. Big Win: WordCamp Europe’s Contributor Day was very productive. New tools/workflow are in place and two team representatives were there to lead and help. Interested in updates from the first quarter of this year? You can find those here: https://make.wordpress.org/updates/2018/04/24/quarterly-updates-q1-2018/

Update on Gutenberg

Progress on the Gutenberg project, the new content creating experience coming to WordPress, has come a long way. Since the start of the project, there have been 30 releases and 12 of those happened after WordCamp US 2017. In total since then, there have been 1,764 issues opened and 1,115 closed as of WordCamp Europe. As the work on phase one moves into its final stretch, here is what you can expect. In Progress Freeze new features in Gutenberg (the feature list can be found here). Hosts, agencies, teachers invited to opt-in sites they have influence over. WordPress.com has opt-in for wp-admin users. The number of sites and posts will be tracked. Mobile app support for Gutenberg will be across iOS and Android. July 4.9.x release with an invitation to install either Gutenberg or Classic Editor plugin. WordPress.com will move to opt-out. There will be tracking to see who opts out and why. Triage increases and bug gardening escalates to get blockers in Gutenberg down to zero. Gutenberg phase two, Customization exploration begins by moving beyond the post. August and beyond All critical issues within Gutenberg are resolved. There is full integration with Calypso and there is opt-in for users there. A goal will be 100k+ sites having made 250k+ posts using Gutenberg. Core merge of Gutenberg begins the 5.0 release cycle. 5.0 moves into beta releases and translations are completed. There will be a mobile version of Gutenberg by the end of the year. WordPress 5.0 could be as soon as August with hundreds of thousands of sites using Gutenberg before release. Learn more about Gutenberg here, take it for a test drive, install on your site, follow along on GitHub and give your feedback.

WordPress 4.9.7 Security and Maintenance Release

WordPress 4.9.7 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately. WordPress versions 4.9.6 and earlier are affected by a media issue that could potentially allow a user with certain capabilities to attempt to delete files outside the uploads directory. Thank you to Slavco for reporting the original issue and Matt Barry for reporting related issues. Seventeen other bugs were fixed in WordPress 4.9.7. Particularly of note were: Taxonomy: Improve cache handling for term queries. Posts, Post Types: Clear post password cookie when logging out. Widgets: Allow basic HTML tags in sidebar descriptions on Widgets admin screen. Community Events Dashboard: Always show the nearest WordCamp if one is coming up, even if there are multiple Meetups happening first. Privacy: Make sure default privacy policy content does not cause a fatal error when flushing rewrite rules outside of the admin context. Download WordPress 4.9.7 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically. The previously scheduled 4.9.7 is now referred to as 4.9.8, and will follow the release schedule posted yesterday. Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.7: 1naveengiri, Aaron Jorbin, abdullahramzan, alejandroxlopez, Andrew Ozz, Arun, Birgir Erlendsson (birgire), BjornW, Boone Gorges, Brandon Kraft, Chetan Prajapati, David Herrera, Felix Arntz, Gareth, Ian Dunn, ibelanger, John Blackbourn, Jonathan Desrosiers, Joy, khaihong, lbenicio, Leander Iversen, mermel, metalandcoffee, Migrated to @jeffpaul, palmiak, Sergey Biryukov, skoldin, Subrata Sarkar, Towhidul Islam, warmlaundry, and YuriV.

The Month in WordPress: June 2018

With one of the two flagship WordCamp events taking place this month, as well as some important WordPress project announcements, there’s no shortage of news. Learn more about what happened in the WordPress community in June. Another Successful WordCamp Europe On June 14th, WordCamp Europe kicked off three days of learning and contributions in Belgrade. Over 2,000 people attended in person, with hundreds more watching live streams of the sessions. The WordCamp was a great success with plenty of first-time attendees and new WordPress contributors getting involved in the project and community. Recorded sessions from the 65 speakers at the event will be available on WordPress.tv in the coming weeks. In the meantime, check out the photos from the event. The next WordCamp Europe takes place on June 20-22 2019 in Berlin, Germany. If you’re based in Europe and would like to serve on the organizing team, fill in the application form. Updated Roadmap for the New WordPress Content Editor During his keynote session at WordCamp Europe, Matt Mullenweg presented an updated roadmap for Gutenberg, the new content editor coming in WordPress 5.0. While the editor is in rapid development, with v3.1 being released this past month, the team is aiming to ship Gutenberg with WordPress Core in August, 2018. This is not set in stone — the release date may shift as development progresses — but this gives the first realistic idea of when we can expect the editor to be released. If you would like to contribute to Gutenberg, read the handbook, follow the Core team blog, and join the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. WordCamp Incubator Cities Announced The WordCamp Incubator program helps spread WordPress to underserved communities by providing organizing support for their first WordCamp. The first iteration of this program ran successfully in 2016 and empowered three cities to start their own WordPress communities. This year, the Community Team is running the Incubator program again. After receiving applications from 104 communities, they have selected Montevideo, Uruguay and Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia to participate in the program. Both cities will receive direct help from experienced WordCamp organizers to run their first-ever WordCamp as a way to help their WordPress community get started. To find out more about the Incubator program follow the Community team blog, and join the #community-events channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Further Reading: The WordPress community of Spain recently received an award for being the best open-source community in the country. This month, WordPress reached the milestone of powering 31% of websites. WP Rig is a brand new tool to help WordPress developers build better themes. Block Unit Test is a new plugin to help theme developers prepare for Gutenberg. Near the end of the month, Zac Gordon hosted an online conference focused on JavaScript development in WordPress – the session videos will be available on YouTube soon. If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: May 2018

This month saw two significant milestones in the WordPress community — the 15th anniversary of the project, and GDPR-related privacy tools coming to WordPress Core. Read on to find out more about this and everything else that happened in the WordPress community in May. Local Communities Celebrate the 15th Anniversary of WordPress Last Sunday, May 27, WordPress turned 15 years old. This is a noteworthy occasion for an open-source project like WordPress and one well worth celebrating. To mark the occasion, WordPress communities across the world gathered for parties and meetups in honor of the milestone. Altogether, there were 224 events globally, with a few more of those still scheduled to take place in some communities — attend one in your area if you can. If your city doesn’t have a WordPress meetup group, this is a great opportunity to start one! Learn how with the Meetup Organizer Handbook, and join the #community-events channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Privacy Tools added to WordPress core In light of recent changes to data privacy regulations in the EU, WordPress Core shipped important updates in the v4.9.6 release, giving site owners tools to help them comply with the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). It is worth noting, however, that WordPress cannot ensure you are compliant — this is still a site owner’s responsibility. The new privacy tools include a number of features focused on providing privacy and personal data management to all site users — asking commenters for explicit consent to store their details in a cookie, providing site owners with an easy way to publish a Privacy Policy, and providing data export and erasure tools to all site users that can be extended by plugins to allow the handling of data that they introduce. To find out more about these features and the other updates, read the 4.9.6 update guide. You can also get involved in contributing to this part of WordPress Core by jumping into the #core-privacy channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and following the Core team blog. Updates to the WordPress.org Privacy Policy In a similar vein, WordPress.org itself has received an updated Privacy Policy to make clear what is being tracked and how your data is handled. Along with that, a Cookie Policy has also been added to explain just what is collected and stored in your browser when using the site. These policies cover all sites on the WordPress.org network — including WordPress.org, WordPress.net, WordCamp.org, BuddyPress.org, bbPress.org, and other related domains and subdomains. It’s important to note that this does not mean that anything has changed in terms of data storage; rather that these documents clarify what data is stored and how it is handled. Further Reading: WordCamp US 2018 has opened up speaker submissions for the December event. Live stream tickets are now available for WordCamp Europe, happening on June 14-16. Gutenberg, the new editor for WordPress Core, is getting ever closer to the final stages with a major update this month. In preparation for Gutenberg, significant work has been done to improve WordPress Core’s build process. If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

WordPress.org Privacy Policy Updates

The WordPress.org privacy policy has been updated, hurray! While we weren’t able to remove all the long sentences, we hope you find the revisions make it easier to understand: how we collect and use data, how long the data we collect is retained, and how you can request a copy of the data you’ve shared with us. There hasn’t been any change to the data that WordPress.org collects or how that data is used; the privacy policy just provides more detail now. Happy reading, and thanks for using WordPress!  

WordPress 4.9.6 Privacy and Maintenance Release

WordPress 4.9.6 is now available. This is a privacy and maintenance release. We encourage you to update your sites to take advantage of the new privacy features. Privacy The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) takes effect on May 25. The GDPR requires companies and site owners to be transparent about how they collect, use, and share personal data. It also gives individuals more access and choice when it comes to how their own personal data is collected, used, and shared. It’s important to understand that while the GDPR is a European regulation, its requirements apply to all sites and online businesses that collect, store, and process personal data about EU residents no matter where the business is located. You can learn more about the GDPR from the European Commission’s Data Protection page. We’re committed to supporting site owners around the world in their work to comply with this important law. As part of that effort, we’ve added a number of new privacy features in this release. Comments Logged-out commenters will be given a choice on whether their name, email address, and website are saved in a cookie on their browser. Privacy Policy Page Site owners can now designate a privacy policy page. This page will be shown on your login and registration pages. You should manually add a link to your policy to every page on your website. If you have a footer menu, that’s a great place to include your privacy policy. In addition, we’ve created a guide that includes insights from WordPress and participating plugins on how they handle personal data. These insights can be copied and pasted into your site’s privacy policy to help you get started. If you maintain a plugin that collects data, we recommend including that information in WordPress’ privacy policy guide. Learn more in our Privacy section of the Plugin Handbook. Data Handling Data Export Site owners can export a ZIP file containing a user’s personal data, using data gathered by WordPress and participating plugins. Data Erasure Site owners can erase a user’s personal data, including data collected by participating plugins. Howdy, A request has been made to perform the following action on your account: Export Personal Data To confirm this, please click on the following link:http://.wordpress.org/wp-login.php?action=confirmaction… You can safely ignore and delete this email if you do not want to take this action. This email has been sent to you@example.com. Regards,Your friends at WordPress http://wordpress.org Site owners have a new email-based method that they can use to confirm personal data requests. This request confirmation tool works for both export and erasure requests, and for both registered users and commenters. Maintenance 95 updates were made in WordPress 4.9.6. In addition to the above, particularly of note were: “Mine” has been added as a filter in the media library. When viewing a plugin in the admin, it will now tell you the minimum PHP version required. We’ve added new PHP polyfills for forwards-compatibility and proper variable validation. TinyMCE was updated to the latest version (4.7.11). This post has more information about all of the issues fixed in 4.9.6 if you’d like to learn more. Download WordPress 4.9.6 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically. Please note that if you’re currently on WordPress 4.9.3, you should manually update your site immediately. Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.6:Aaron D. Campbell, Aaron Jorbin, abdullahramzan, Adam Silverstein, Alain Schlesser, allendav, Andrea Fercia, Andrea Middleton, Andrew Ozz, Ayesh Karunaratne, Birgir Erlendsson (birgire), bridgetwillard, Burlington Bytes, Chetan Prajapati, claudiu, Corey McKrill, Daniel Bachhuber, David Herrera, Dominik Schilling (ocean90), Ella Van Dorpe, Eric Daams, Fernando Claussen, Garrett Hyder, Gary Pendergast, Heather Burns, Helen Hou-Sandi, herregroen, Ian Dunn, ibelanger, imath, Jb Audras, Jeffrey Paul, Jeremy Felt, Jesper V Nielsen, JJJ, Joe McGill, John Blackbourn, Jonathan Desrosiers, Josepha, jrf, Kåre Mulvad Steffensen, Laken Hafner, laurelfulford, lbenicio, macbookandrew, Marius L. J., Mel Choyce, Michael Nelson, Mike Jolley, Pascal Casier, pbrocks, postphotos, Prashant Baldha, PressTigers, programmin, Robin Cornett, Sergey Biryukov, Stefano Lissa, Stephane Daury (stephdau), Subrata Sarkar, Tammie Lister, teddytime, thomasplevy, Timothy Jacobs, Tobias Zimpel, Tom J Nowell, Tor-Bjorn Fjellner, Towhidul Islam, voneff, William Earnhardt, and Xenos (xkon) Konstantinos.

The Month in WordPress: April 2018

This past month saw a lot of preparation for upcoming events and releases across the WordPress project. Read on to find out more about these plans, and everything else that happened around the community in April. The WordPress 15th Anniversary is Coming On May 27 2018, WordPress will turn 15 years old — this is a huge milestone for the project, or, indeed, for any open-source platform. The Community Team has been hard at work helping communities around the world plan local anniversary parties. Check the central anniversary website to see if there’s already a party being planned near you. These parties are all organized by local communities — if there’s no local community in your area, you can start one today and host a party yourself. Work has Started on a Gutenberg Migration Guide With Gutenberg, the upcoming WordPress content editor, in rapid development, a lot of people have been wondering how they will convert their existing plugins to work with the new features. To mitigate the issues here and help people overcome any migration hurdles, a Gutenberg Migration Guide is underway to assist developers with making their code Gutenberg-compatible. If you’d like to contribute to this guide, you can review the existing documentation on GitHub and open a new issue if you find something to add. Theme Review Team Launches Trusted Authors Program Reviews of themes submitted to the Theme Directory can take quite a while to complete. In order to combat this issue and to make the theme submission process smoother for everyone, the Theme Review Team is introducing a Trusted Authors Program. This program will allow frequent and reliable theme authors to apply for trusted status, allowing them to upload themes more frequently and to have their themes automatically approved. This will allow more high-quality themes to be added to the directory, as well as recognize the hard work that authors put in to build their themes. If you would like to get involved with reviewing themes, you can read their getting started guide, follow the team blog and join the #themereview channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Further Reading: WordPress 4.9.5 was released early this month, fixing numerous bugs and potential security issues. The two leads for this release published some interesting feedback about the process. In addition to the Trusted Authors Program mentioned above, the Theme Review Team is making some changes to their review process to minimize theme review delays. The Marketing Team produced a handy Contributor Day onboarding PDF for organizers to hand out to contributors attending WordCamps. The Accessibility Team is actively looking for contributors for their handbook. A new type of WordCamp, targeted at organizers, is in the planning stages now. The WordPress.org About pages received a significant redesign to make them more clear and useful. The Community Team posted the roadmap for this year’s WordCamp Incubator program. If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

Celebrate the WordPress 15th Anniversary on May 27

May 27, 2018 is the 15th anniversary of the first WordPress release — and we can’t wait to celebrate! Party time! Join WordPress fans all over the world in celebrating the 15th Anniversary of WordPress by throwing your own party! Here’s how you can join in the fun: Check the WordPress 15th Anniversary website to see if there’s a party already planned for your town. If there is, RSVP for the party and invite your friends! If there isn’t, then pick a place to go where a bunch of people can be merry — a park, a pub, a backyard; any family-friendly venue will do! List your party with your local WordPress meetup group (Don’t have a group? Start one!)  and then spread the word to other local meetups, tech groups, press, etc and get people to say they’ll come to your party. Request some special 15th anniversary WordPress swag (no later than April 27, please, so we have time to ship it to you). Have party attendees post photos, videos, and the like with the #WP15 hashtag, and check out the social media stream to see how the rest of the world is sharing and celebrating. Don’t miss this chance to participate in a global celebration of WordPress! Special Swag In honor of the 15th anniversary, we’ve added some special 15th anniversary items in the swag store — you can use the offer code CELEBRATEWP15 to take 15% off this (and any other WordPress swag you buy), all the way through the end of 2018! Keep checking the swag store, because we’ll be adding more swag over the next few weeks! Share the fun However you celebrate the WordPress 15th anniversary — with a party, with commemorative swag, by telling the world what WordPress means to you — remember to use the #WP15 hashtag to share it! And don’t forget to check the stream of WordPress 15th anniversary posts. When 30% of the internet has a reason to celebrate, you know it’s going to be great!

GDPR Compliance Tools in WordPress

GDPR compliance is an important consideration for all WordPress websites. The GDPR Compliance team is looking for help to test the privacy tools that are currently being developed in core. What is GDPR? GDPR stands for General Data Protection Regulation and is intended to strengthen and unify data protection for all individuals within the European Union. Its primary aim is to give control back to the EU residents over their personal data. Why the urgency? Although the GDPR was introduced two years ago, it becomes  enforceable starting May 25, 2018. Make WordPress GDPR Compliance Team Currently, the GDPR Compliance Team understands that helping WordPress-based sites become compliant is a large and ongoing task. The team is focusing on creating a comprehensive core policy, plugin guidelines, privacy tools and documentation. All of this requires your help. The GDPR Compliance Team is focusing on four main areas: Add functionality to assist site owners in creating comprehensive privacy policies for their websites. Create guidelines for plugins to become GDPR ready. Add administration tools to facilitate compliance and encourage user privacy in general. Add documentation to educate site owners on privacy, the main GDPR compliance requirements, and on how to use the new privacy tools. Don’t we already have a privacy policy? Yes and no. That said, The GDPR puts tighter guidelines and restrictions. Though we have many plugins that create privacy pages, we need means to generate a unified, comprehensive privacy policy. We will need tools for users to easily come into compliance. Site owners will be able to create GDPR compliant privacy policy in three steps: Adding a dedicated page for the policy. Adding privacy information from plugins. Reviewing and publishing the policy. A new “postbox” will be added to the Edit Page screen when editing the policy. All plugins that collect or store user data will be able to add privacy information there. In addition it will alert the site owners when any privacy information changes after a plugin is activated, deactivated, or updated. There is a new functionality to confirm user requests by email address. It is intended for site owners to be able to verify requests from users for displaying, downloading, or anonymizing of personal data. A new “Privacy” page is added under the “Tools” menu. It will display new, confirmed requests from users, as well as already fulfilled requests. It will also contain the tools for exporting and anonymizing of personal data and for requesting email confirmation to avoid abuse attempts. New section on privacy will be added to the Plugin Handbook. It will contain some general information on user privacy, what a plugin should do to be compliant, and also tips and examples on how to use the new privacy related functionality in WordPress. The new privacy tools are scheduled for release at the end of April or beginning of May 2018. How can you get involved? We would love to have your help. The first step is awareness and education. For more information about the upcoming privacy tools see the roadmap. If you would like to get involved in building WordPress Core and testing the new privacy tools, please join the #gdpr-compliance channel in the Make WordPress Slack group.

WordPress 4.9.5 Security and Maintenance Release

WordPress 4.9.5 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately. WordPress versions 4.9.4 and earlier are affected by three security issues. As part of the core team's ongoing commitment to security hardening, the following fixes have been implemented in 4.9.5: Don't treat localhost as same host by default. Use safe redirects when redirecting the login page if SSL is forced. Make sure the version string is correctly escaped for use in generator tags. Thank you to the reporters of these issues for practicing coordinated security disclosure: xknown of the WordPress Security Team, Nitin Venkatesh (nitstorm), and Garth Mortensen of the WordPress Security Team. Twenty-five other bugs were fixed in WordPress 4.9.5. Particularly of note were: The previous styles on caption shortcodes have been restored. Cropping on touch screen devices is now supported. A variety of strings such as error messages have been updated for better clarity. The position of an attachment placeholder during uploads has been fixed. Custom nonce functionality in the REST API JavaScript client has been made consistent throughout the code base. Improved compatibility with PHP 7.2. This post has more information about all of the issues fixed in 4.9.5 if you'd like to learn more. Download WordPress 4.9.5 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click "Update Now." Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically. Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.5: 1265578519, Aaron Jorbin, Adam Silverstein, Alain Schlesser, alexgso, Andrea Fercia, andrei0x309, antipole, Anwer AR, Birgir Erlendsson (birgire), Blair jersyer, Brooke., Chetan Prajapati, codegrau, conner_bw, David A. Kennedy, designsimply, Dion Hulse, Dominik Schilling (ocean90), ElectricFeet, ericmeyer, FPCSJames, Garrett Hyder, Gary Pendergast, Gennady Kovshenin, Henry Wright, Jb Audras, Jeffrey Paul, Jip Moors, Joe McGill, Joen Asmussen, John Blackbourn, johnpgreen, Junaid Ahmed, kristastevens, Konstantin Obenland, Laken Hafner, Lance Willett, leemon, Mel Choyce, Mike Schroder, mrmadhat, nandorsky, Nidhi Jain, Pascal Birchler, qcmiao, Rachel Baker, Rachel Peter, RavanH, Samuel Wood (Otto), Sebastien SERRE, Sergey Biryukov, Shital Marakana, Stephen Edgar, Tammie Lister, Thomas Vitale, Will Kwon, and Yahil Madakiya.

The Month in WordPress: March 2018

With a significant new milestone and some great improvements to WordPress as a platform, this month has been an important one for the project. Read on to find out more about what happened during the month of March. WordPress Now Powers 30% of the Internet Over the last 15 years, the popularity and usage of WordPress has been steadily growing. That growth hit a significant milestone this month when W3Techs reported that WordPress now powers over 30% of sites on the web. The percentage is determined based on W3Techs’ review of the top 10 million sites on the web, and it’s a strong indicator of the popularity and flexibility of WordPress as a platform. If you would like to have hand in helping to grow WordPress even further, you can get involved today. WordPress Jargon Glossary Goes Live The WordPress Marketing Team has been hard at work lately putting together a comprehensive glossary of WordPress jargon to help newcomers to the project become more easily acquainted with things. The glossary is available here along with a downloadable PDF to make it simpler to reference offline. Publishing this resource is part of an overall effort to make WordPress more easily accessible for people who are not so familiar with the project. If you would like to assist the Marketing Team with this, you can follow the team blog and join the #marketing channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Focusing on Privacy in WordPress Online privacy has been in the news this month for all the wrong reasons. It has reinforced the commitment of the GDPR Compliance Team to continue working on enhancements to WordPress core that allow site owners to improve privacy standards. The team's work, and the wider privacy project, spans four areas: Adding tools which will allow site administrators to collect the information they need about their sites, examining the plugin guidelines with privacy in mind, enhancing privacy standards in WordPress core, and creating documentation focused on best practices in online privacy. To get involved with the project, you can view the roadmap, follow the updates, submit patches, and join the #gdpr-compliance channel in the Making WordPress Slack group. Office hours are 15:00 UTC on Wednesdays. Further Reading: The WordPress Foundation has published their annual report for 2017 showing just how much the community has grown over the last year. The dates for WordCamp US have been announced — this flagship WordCamp event will be held on 7-9 December this year in Nashville, Tennessee. WordPress 4.9.5 is due for release on April 3 — find out more here. Version 2.5 of Gutenberg, the new editor for WordPress core, was released this month with a host of great improvements. WordSesh, a virtual WordPress conference, is returning in July this year. If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

The Month in WordPress: February 2018

Judging by the flurry of activity across the WordPress project throughout February, it looks like everyone is really getting into the swing of things for 2018. There have been a lot of interesting new developments, so read on to see what the community has been up to for the past month. WordPress 4.9.3 & 4.9.4 Early in the month, version 4.9.3 of WordPress was released, including a number of important bug fixes. Unfortunately it introduced a bug that prevented many sites from automatically updating to future releases. To remedy this issue, version 4.9.4 was released the following day requiring many people to manually update their sites. While this kind of issue is always regrettable, the good thing is that it was fixed quickly, and that not all sites had updated to 4.9.3 yet, which meant they bypassed the bug in that version. You can find out more technical information about this issue on the Core development blog. The WordCamp Incubator is Back In 2016, the Global Community Team ran an experimental program to help spread WordPress to underserved areas by providing more significant organizing support for their first WordCamp event. This program was dubbed the WordCamp Incubator, and it was so successful in the three cities where it ran that the program is back for 2018. Right now, the Community Team is looking for cities to be a part of this year’s incubator by taking applications. Additionally, each incubator community will need an experienced WordCamp organizer to assist them as a co-lead organizer for their event — if that sounds interesting to you, then you can fill in the application form for co-leads. You can find out further information about the WordCamp Incubator on the Community Team blog. WordPress Meetup Roundtables scheduled for March In order to assist local WordPress meetup organizers with running their meetup groups, some members of the Community Team have organized weekly meetup roundtable discussions through the month of March. These will be run as video chats at 16:00 UTC every Wednesday this month and will be a great place for meetup organizers to come together and help each other out with practical ideas and advice. If you are not already in the WordPress meetup program and would like to join, you can find out more information in the WordPress Meetup Organizer Handbook. GDPR Compliance in WordPress Core The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is an upcoming regulation that will affect all online services across Europe. In order to prepare for this, a working group has been formed to make sure that WordPress is compliant with the GDPR regulations. Aside from the fact that this will be a requirement for the project going forward, it will also have an important and significant impact on the privacy and security of WordPress as a whole. The working group has posted their proposed roadmap for this project and it looks very promising. To get involved in building WordPress Core, jump into the #gdpr-compliance channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and follow the Core team blog. Further Reading: WPShout published a thorough guide to WordPress security. The Community Team has published interesting statistics from the WordCamp program in 2016 and 2017. An intriguing proposal has been made for a new ‘Onboarding’ team to be started in the WordPress project. The new editing experience for WordPress, named Gutenberg, continues to be actively developed with a feature-packed release this past month. The Advanced WordPress Facebook group held an interview with WordPress co-founder, Matt Mullenweg about the Gutenberg project. Two factor authentication is on its way to the WordPress.org network — this will be a great improvement to the overall security of the project. If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

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