Social Media Sites Blogs

Finding News on LinkedIn

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Keeping tabs on industry news and trending stories can be essential to your day-to-day work. Knowing what is going on in the world, and hearing expert opinions on that news, can make you work smarter and help you have more engaging conversations with your colleagues.  But time is limited in a busy work schedule. When looking for news, we not only want to know what’s being discussed quickly, but also want to get smarter by discovering diverse perspectives and joining the conversation. That’s why... .

National Boss’s Day: Find the Right Boss (and Job!) For You

LinkedIn Official Blog -

It’s National Boss’s Day -- a holiday created 60 years ago to celebrate all the great managers in the workforce. Having a good boss is crucial to your success and happiness at work; and today, professionals throughout the U.S. will be taking a moment to recognize the support and encouragement they have received from those bosses and mentors who have influenced their careers.  But, what does this day mean for you if you’re looking for a new job? A new boss is a key factor during the job hunt --... .

Planning an in Person Professional Gathering Just Got Easier With LinkedIn Events

LinkedIn Official Blog -

One of the most important aspects of building professional relationships for our members is being able to meet face to face. Whether at a local networking meet-up, a workshop or an alumni gathering, in-person interactions can help you create and foster deeper professional relationships. In fact, our data says that the chances of people accepting connection requests on LinkedIn increase 2X if they have attended a face-to-face meeting. To help you plan your next face-to-face professional... .

Three Ways You Can Take the Plus One Pledge and Help Close the Network Gap

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Last month at Talent Connect, our CEO Jeff Weiner introduced the network gap -- the advantage some people have to access opportunities based on where they grew up, where they went to school, or where they work and called on people to come together to help close it by taking the Plus One Pledge. We’re inspired by the stories many of you have shared about the “Plus One” mindset you already have. And we’re encouraged to hear that so many of you want to help people who don’t have access to the... .

The Future of Work Could Be At Home

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Working from home has been on the radar of professionals for years. It used to be reserved for the occasional furniture delivery or an in-a-pinch necessity; but now, as technology has improved and professionals seek more flexibility, major organizations are incorporating remote work policies across the board. In fact, with almost half of U.S. professionals working from home on occasion, it’s so common these days that there’s actually a national holiday week celebrating remote work -- and it... .

Connect, Follow or Message: How to Build the Best Professional Relationships on LinkedIn

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Building a thoughtful LinkedIn network is a great way to open doors for getting and giving career advice. But, growing your network isn’t just about the quantity of connections you have. In fact, we recommend multiple ways to have enriching conversations and meaningful interactions with people on LinkedIn.  Know when to connect Everyone talks about LinkedIn connections and the benefits they provide as you grow your professional career. And that is the truth! But, who exactly should you connect... .

Closing the Network Gap

LinkedIn Official Blog -

At LinkedIn, we believe that two people with equal talent should have equal access to opportunity. But unfortunately, that’s not always the case.  We’ve all heard that “who you know” matters, and research proves that’s true. More than 70% of professionals get hired at companies where they already have a connection. And on LinkedIn, applicants who are referred to a job by a current employee are nine times more likely to get hired.  In other words, networks matter a lot. But, like opportunity,... .

Designing with Compassion

Facebook Design -

Keeping people at the heart of product developmentBy Davina Baum and Jessica MetroAs content strategists, researchers and product designers at Facebook, we aim to create experiences that are clear, consistent and compassionate through both the language and the design. Everything from the tone we use to the controls we provide helps to make products across Facebook that are more thoughtful, more human and better for the people using them.Building for People FirstWe work together to consider the entire user experience, paying close attention to both the product design and the content strategy. The two must coexist in a way that ensures that the products we make actually solve the problems people are facing, that the user experience is intuitive and easy-to-use, and that the visual design feels familiar and engaging. Across Facebook’s family of apps, our teams are dedicated to designing for well-being. We take on topics like suicide prevention, including tools and resources for people at risk and their concerned family and friends; memorialization, to preserve the wishes of people who’ve passed away and support the bereaved; and harassment.A Case StudyAs we learn about how people engage with our products, key insights help guide the decisions we make to launch new products and features, evolve what is already in market, sunset certain features and identify and build teams around new opportunities to create better experiences for people. Back in 2017, our team explored the ways people experience harassment on Facebook, especially through receiving unwanted messages. As a result of these explorations, we built the capability to ignore a conversation in Messenger. Let’s look at the content and product design process through the lens of that product. Our team sees it as a process in four stages — understand, design, gather feedback, build — with some fluidity between each stage as we go.Stage 1: UnderstandWe start each project by doing the work to understand the problem. This helps us recognize people’s needs and uncover opportunities to improve the products we build. The core product team consists of a product manager, data scientist, content strategist, product designers, researchers and engineers. In the case of the work on harassment, the team first aligned on the goal to explore whether our harassment-mitigation tools were serving people’s needs. To understand what people were experiencing, we looked at foundational research insights and survey responses. We also dove into the data to understand behavior at scale and find patterns. To narrow our focus and scope, we condensed all of this information into “people problems,” which are concise explanations of the issues people are facing. The team discussed and debated which ones to address, combining what we knew from existing data and research — as well as engineering constraints — to define the biggest opportunities.People problems and opportunities surfaced during a team sprintLet’s take a step back here, because in many cases, and on our team in particular, “people problems” are serious, real-world problems. A people problem might be, “I want to stop someone I’ve just met online from sending me inappropriate images on Messenger.” These scenarios, reframed as people problems, allow us to abstract and generalize the problem so that it’s solvable — but individuals can’t be abstracted and generalized. So we never lose sight of the people who are facing these problems in the real world — where safety and reputation may be at risk. As a result of our work to understand the problems, we decided that building additional tools to help address harassment over Messenger was the biggest opportunity. Specifically, we heard that the concept of blocking someone on Messenger or Facebook felt extreme for repetitive badgering or for those who knew the harasser in person. While the block feature did not explicitly declare to the person that they’d been blocked, there were indicators that a savvy user might be able to figure out. Even for the person doing the blocking, the action might feel rude. And in cases of harassment, blocking someone on Facebook can prevent you from being able to report them, because they’re hidden from you.Stage 2: DesignWe started to think of our harassment-mitigation tools on Messenger along a spectrum: from muting, which merely turns off notifications, to blocking messages, to blocking on Facebook. But between muting and blocking messages, there was a hole we sought to fill. We wondered, how might the capability to “hide” a conversation work?Spectrum of harassment-mitigation toolsIn broad strokes, we outlined the user experience: The person being hidden could continue to send messages without knowing that their messages were going unseen, and the person hiding the conversation could proceed without being aware of annoying or harassing messages. If the recipient needed to seek out the conversation, they could find it easily and unhide it if necessary. They could also block someone they had hidden. We had extensive conversations about product functionality, from the very specific to the very broad. We discussed questions like:Where would people expect to find the option to hide a conversation?How do we communicate what will happen without overwhelming someone?Where should the balance be between feeling lightweight versus robust and satisfying?What exactly does the person who’s being ignored see?What is the visual affordance to indicate the feature is on or off?Where do we surface the ability to escalate to a block?How will this work across Android, iOS, mobile web, desktop web and all the other platforms we support?Whiteboard wireframes mapping out the flowWhile answering these questions, we sketched out design solutions, starting wide and narrowing to what might have the greatest impact. We created mid-fidelity mocks to get a better sense of how the top solution would fit in the existing product, explored content options in context and visualized the design details. We talked a lot amongst ourselves and with our content and design colleagues to get feedback and ensure that we were thinking deeply from the perspective of people experiencing these problems. To flesh out the interaction design and make our ideas feel like a real product, we eventually created high-fidelity prototypes.High-fidelity interface explorationsStage 3: Gather FeedbackHow could we deepen our understanding of this problem space? We needed to do in-person research. Data plus existing research on harassment got us part of the way to understanding the problem. In order to ensure our solutions truly meet people’s needs, our content strategy and design teams rely heavily on research — and that often takes us away from our offices and into the world. In our case, we’re based in California, so our team planned a trip to India to get a first-hand understanding of how people who live in a culture different than our own experience harassment on Facebook and Messenger. Our team — including two researchers, a product manager, two product designers, a content strategist and an engineer — traveled to Delhi and Ghaziabad, a smaller city near Delhi. We conducted focus groups (grouped by men and women) and in-home interviews, speaking with a wide range of people. To get a sense of how they understand and use the current blocking options, we showed them the existing tools for blocking messages, receiving message requests, or turning on the ability to review the posts you’re tagged in. We then sought their feedback on prototypes for new ideas including the feature to hide conversations and a promotion to raise awareness about message blocking.Early prototypes used for feedback in researchIn doing this research, we wanted to understand both the perspective of someone who’s being harassed or bothered on Messenger, and that of a person who’s repeatedly trying to contact someone. People in our focus groups talked about seeing Facebook as a way to connect with anyone in the world; there’s a real curiosity and interest in meeting new people online. Both men and women said that they accept any and all friend requests, no matter how remote the connection. We also heard from women who told us how easily and often the line can be crossed from friendly hellos to unwanted contact and harassment. We got a strong sense of the pervasive ways that harassment plays out in the real world, in all sorts of interactions. We spoke to participants who said they had experienced a lot of harassment on Facebook, so we knew we’d hear difficult stories. But we also heard strength and courage — as well as a deep familiarity with the tools at hand. Men and women understood the functionality to block both a message as well as a person on Facebook, and they had no issues with blocking someone who was bothering them. “I just blocked him” was a refrain we heard over and over. But we also confirmed that in certain situations, there’s a need to stop hearing from someone who’s sending harassing messages without explicitly blocking them because it could cause serious real-world implications.Unwanted and harassing messages have no place on our platform.This is where the work becomes really, really hard. Harassment affects millions of people every day — well beyond Messenger. We know that a button on Messenger will not take away the memory of a harassment experience, and it won’t mean that something upsetting won’t happen again. Unwanted and harassing messages have no place on our platform. To help combat this behavior, we work to adjust and augment the tools that someone might be using. In the early stages of this project, we had been referring to the functionality as “hide.” We learned on this research trip that people were already familiar with the capability to hide a comment on Facebook, which didn’t align with the idea of hiding an entire conversation with someone on Messenger. So, after much discussion and exploration of options, we shifted our language to “ignore.”Stage 4: BuildAs with any product, we collaborated with our engineering colleagues who were building the back-end functionality and front-end interface. We needed to ensure that the product we designed was technically feasible, while still being intuitive to use. Once we launched the ignore functionality, we ran surveys and analyzed data to understand how it was (and is) performing. We found that it was quickly adopted and coexisted harmoniously with blocking and other harassment-mitigation tools. However, we also needed to account for group messages, so we iterated and did another round of usability research to ensure that the built product was intuitive, valuable and easy to understand.Final prototype for the feature to ignore messagesA Learner’s MindsetAs product designers, content strategists, and researchers, everyone can leverage each other’s skills on the team to deeply understand the problems people are facing, lead the team’s efforts to design solutions for those problems, show prototypes to real people for their feedback, and work collaboratively with engineers to bring the final product experience to life. But our design work does not stop there. Testing, learning, iterating and sometimes making decisions to sunset products and features is all part of the journey to getting it right for the people who use our products. This work has been one step along that journey to determine the best way to help people avoid harassment on Messenger. We’re proud to have the opportunity to continue learning and designing for well-being, keeping people at the center of our work each day.Designing with Compassion was originally published in Facebook Design on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

A New Holiday to Celebrate: Fall Hiring Season

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Fall is here and while you might associate the new season with football, foliage and pumpkin-spiced everything, it’s also hiring season and the best time of year to look for a new job. In fact, there are more available job postings on LinkedIn in October than any other month. What’s more, 89% of hiring managers tell us it takes less than four weeks to fill a role, so if you start your search now, you could be in a new gig by Halloween.  With more than 20 million jobs available on LinkedIn and... .

Announcing Skill Assessments to Help You Showcase Your Skills

LinkedIn Official Blog -

We know it’s important to have a way to effectively show the skills you spend time cultivating. In fact, according to new LinkedIn research, 69% of professionals think their skills are more important than college education when job-seeking, and more than 76% wish there was a way for hiring managers to verify their skills so they could stand out amongst other candidates. That’s why we’re we’re excited to roll out LinkedIn Skill Assessments, a new way for you to validate the skills you have. When... .

Tap Your Linkedin Network to Fill Your Project Needs

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Whether it’s a marketing guru to help you with your website, a copywriter extraordinaire to manage your blog, a career coach to help you nail your next interview, or a tax genius to help you navigate your return, the LinkedIn network can help you find someone who can help.  We’ve rolled out some new tools to help you find the right service providers that can help you get the job done.  Search For Help Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to search for service providers and freelancers and not only... .

Staying Safe on LinkedIn During Your Job Search

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Every day we’re making our professional community a place where everyone can find economic opportunity and pathways to grow their careers. And when it comes to finding that new opportunity, learning a skill or getting and giving career advice, you expect that process to be exciting and maybe a little nerve wracking, but never unsafe. Millions of people use LinkedIn to search and apply for jobs every day -- and when job searching, safety means knowing the recruiter you’re chatting with is who... .

The 2019 LinkedIn Top Startups Are Growing Fast -- and Hiring Even Faster

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Today, we revealed the 2019 LinkedIn Top Startups in the U.S. list, identifying the top 50 hottest startups to work for today as determined by billions of actions of more than 645+ million professionals on LinkedIn.  Our annual Top Startups list is a reflection of how work is changing (more than 75% of startups on the list say that a college degree isn’t required for job applicants), which new industries are emerging and rapidly growing (this is the first time we’ve seen the cannabis industry... .

LinkedIn by the Sea: A Glimpse Into Grimsby’s Future

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Earlier this summer, I wrote about a new project we have launched in the UK coastal town of Grimsby, a place synonymous with the British fishing industry. Like similar towns across the country, it’s suffered economically in recent times and is looking to   embrace new thinking to open up future employment opportunities for local people.  In the past few months, we’ve had inspiring conversations with jobseekers, educators, local politicians and the business community. They’ve helped us to better... .

An Update on How We’re Fighting Fake Accounts

LinkedIn Official Blog -

LinkedIn continues to grow as an active professional community of more than 645 million members where real people find jobs, advice and a chance at economic opportunity. Our teams are working to keep LinkedIn a safe place for professionals by proactively finding fake profiles then removing them and any content they share. Between January and June 2019, we took action on 21.6 million fake accounts. This includes: Preventing 19.5 million fake accounts from being created at registration. This... .

Out of Office: How to Actually Disconnect During Your Summer Vacation

LinkedIn Official Blog -

With summer in full swing, vacation is on the minds – and calendars – of most of us. So much so, it’s one of the three most important benefits professionals want when considering a new job. Nearly 75% of professionals would turn down a job offer if the vacation policy didn’t meet their expectations, according to new LinkedIn research released today. Regardless, nearly half (46%) of professionals admit to not taking all their vacation time last year, pointing to reasons like having too much work... .

Ace the Interview: Tackle Tough Questions and Prep Like a Pro

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Interviewing for a new job can be nerve wracking. With so much riding on making a great impression, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. So, it’s no surprise that two-thirds (67%) of millennials feel uneasy about job interviews. Almost 40% would rather spend an entire weekend cleaning out their garage than meet with a hiring manager, 15% of millennials feel so nervous they could throw up before every interview, and 80% admit to being stumped by interview questions. But don’t let your fear leading up... .

Helping You Build a Trusted Community - One Connection At a Time

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Making a connection on LinkedIn can open doors to getting and giving career help. Here are our top tips for getting the right connections to help you find a job, get career advice, and guide you on the next steps of your journey. Build your LinkedIn community with people you already know and trust. Imagine you’ve moved to a new town for your job, and you’re exploring new friendships and community. Most likely you want to start off with people you already know and trust. The same is true on... .

Helping You Build a Trusted Community - One Connection At a Time

LinkedIn Official Blog -

Making a connection on LinkedIn can open doors to getting and giving career help. Here are our top tips for getting the right connections to help you find a job, get career advice, and guide you on the next steps of your journey. Build your LinkedIn community with people you already know and trust. Imagine you’ve moved to a new town for your job, and you’re exploring new friendships and community. Most likely you want to start off with people you already know and trust. The same is true on... .

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