Industry Blogs

How to Improve Your Facebook Ads During a Holiday Season

Social Media Examiner -

Do you run seasonal Facebook ads during Christmas, Hanukkah, or any other holiday season? Wondering how to run more successful holiday ad campaigns? In this article, you’ll discover how to warm up an audience and deliver holiday-themed Facebook advertising campaigns. Why Seasonal and Holiday Ad Campaigns Matter For many businesses, seasonal campaign performance can be […] The post How to Improve Your Facebook Ads During a Holiday Season appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

6 Social Media Marketing Attribution Models and Tools to Help Marketers

Social Media Examiner -

Do you want a better way to track your social media marketing conversions? Looking for tools that can help you better measure attribution? In this article, you’ll discover six attribution models and tools that can help you. Why Attribution Matters to Marketers One common challenge for marketers is performing in-depth analytics. You’re most likely marketing […] The post 6 Social Media Marketing Attribution Models and Tools to Help Marketers appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Creating Branded Content on Instagram: What Marketers Need to Know

Social Media Examiner -

Thinking of partnering with other businesses to create Branded Content on Instagram? Wondering how to get started? In this article, you’ll discover how to set up, create, and analyze branded content posts on Instagram. What Is Branded Content on Instagram? Branded content posts were first introduced on Facebook and have now moved over to Instagram […] The post Creating Branded Content on Instagram: What Marketers Need to Know appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

LinkedIn Events Relaunches: What Marketers Need to Know

Social Media Examiner -

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore LinkedIn’s relaunch of Events, new LinkedIn page features, and Facebook Stories ad updates with special guests, Amanda […] The post LinkedIn Events Relaunches: What Marketers Need to Know appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Landing Page vs Homepage: Which One Should You Promote?

Grow Traffic Blog -

If you want people to visit your website, it’s a good idea to pay for some advertising. The trouble is, you need a goal beyond “visiting my website” for that traffic. You can get people on your pages through a thousand different channels, but the ones you pay for need to be special. Otherwise you’re just wasting money. Landing pages are the true destination for paid advertising. I’m not going to bury the lede here; there’s only one option. Directing paid advertising to your homepage is a foolish move. Think about it. What’s the difference between a landing page and your homepage? A homepage is a hub. It’s a central pillar for your site, from which a user can reach other parts of your site. Depending on the kind of site you run, this can operate differently. A news-style site will have a homepage that is constantly changing, sometimes as often as every few minutes, with new content. A page like the New York Times always has fresh content on the homepage, every time you visit. An industry blog with secondary services will have a homepage like SEO Roundtable’s. It has updated content, though it doesn’t necessarily publish content every single day. Elements like services the site sells are placed on secondary pages through navigation links. A business with a secondary blog might have a page like this as a homepage. It’s sort of a landing page, relatively static, primarily aimed at selling a service. And yet it’s not fully targeted, it’s general use, so it’s hard to make narrow paid ads match the content. A full commerce site like industry giant Amazon has a homepage with a wide range of targeted recommendations. When was the last time you visited Amazon’s homepage rather than a page for a specific product? Running paid ads to a homepage is typically not a great idea. The main reason, if you dig into various PPC networks, is something like Google’s quality score. One of the core elements that makes PPC advertising work is the congruence between the ad copy and the destination. A good paid ad is targeting a narrow audience with narrow messaging, and that audience expects that same level of narrow messaging from the page they find at the other end. Imagine if you clicked on an ad for a pair of shoes you like, saying they were 10% off. When you open up the link, you end up on the main homepage for Nike. Now what? You have to go digging to find that paid of shoes, hope it’s still in stock and that the deal is still active, and you might not even care anymore. You lost the convenience of a simple click-and-buy, and consequently, it’s just as likely that the store lost a sale. Guiding the User The point of paid advertising is to capture a certain segment of your user base and push them deeper in your sales funnel. Typically, you can divide up your audience into five broad groups. Cold. These are the people who don’t know much of anything about anything. They aren’t aware that they have a problem, they aren’t aware of your brand or your products, and they don’t really care. Some of these people can be made aware of the problem they face, with ads that lead to specific pieces of relevant content. Problem-aware. These are the people who moved on from the first step. They know they have a problem, and they’re starting to look into it. They have no idea who you are, though, and they have no idea what the potential solutions to their problem might be. You can reach these people with ads that have copy and landing pages targeted to the specific problem they face. Solution-aware. These are the people from the previous step who are aware that there’s a solution to their problem. They might not know who provides that solution, but they know what to look for in general. This is where you try to capture them with ads with your value proposition; we can solve your problem for you, with X benefit, for Y cost. Purchase-ready. These are the people who have experienced your third-tier marketing and have looked around, and decided that your solution to their problem is probably the best one on offer. You can capture them by spreading specific deals in your advertising, and with landing pages that lead immediately into a store page. Among these, the only one that might possibly benefit from seeing your homepage is the first group, and even then, you can create a more targeted page specifically for different audience sub-groups – rich vs poor, educated vs non, employed vs not, and so on – to better cater your messaging to them. It’s all about user intent, and capturing that intent with your landing page. Your homepage isn’t well suited to capturing any single specific, narrow niche of people. You may be able to entice some users in general, but it’s not as likely as a landing page. Think back to Amazon. Their homepage may be “generic” but it’s actually packed full of extremely personal recommendations. They know what you’ve bought and what you’ve looked at, and they can recommend products you may be interested in. Even though the format is broad-spectrum, with hundreds of products on offer, all of those product choices are personalized to the visitor. What I see on my homepage is not what you’ll see, guaranteed. Imagine if you were searching for a specific pair of shoes you like. You see an ad for Amazon, and it takes you to the Amazon front page. However, you’ve never visited Amazon before. They don’t have any recommendations for you, personalized and ready. So there’s a scattershot on the page. Maybe there’s a pair of earrings, maybe some fishing lures, maybe a new TV, maybe a car stereo, maybe a vacuum, maybe a romance novel. All of these things cover various interests, and maybe you’re interested in a bunch of them, but none of them match your intent when you clicked on the ad. Would you proceed to search for your intended pair of shoes, or would you back out and look for a different store that’s actually promoting what you’re looking for? I know I’d do the latter. Variation, Intent, and Conversion Paid advertising has one goal: to get the user who sees the ad to click on it. Depending on the ads, you may have different goals within that goal. Maybe you want to educate the reader on your products, or maybe you know the reader is already educated and you want to convince them to buy. The key to success with paid advertising, then, is to match content with intent. You do this through variation. I don’t just mean split-testing here.  A/B testing is a powerful tool, but it’s only useful for audiences where you’ve already matched your copy with the audience intent. It’s for second-stage optimization, where we’re talking about first-stage optimization. Think of the audience divisions up above. Could you design one single ad that is compelling to people in all four stages of awareness? Could you write ad copy so good that people who have never heard of your company and people who are intimately aware of your products both click it? Maybe you could, but let me tell you, it won’t be as effective. It will cost more and reach fewer people than if you divided up each of the four stages into their own targeted advertising. Here’s another scenario. You work a 9-5 job, but you’re getting tired of it and you’re getting stressed about it. So you start searching for ways to relieve stress from working all the time. You’re presented with varying levels of solution to this problem. Some ads recommend stress balls, and some recommend yoga, and some recommend a vacation. At this point, you get to think about which of those options fits your needs most closely. Only one of them is likely to be the true solution, and that company “wins” your awareness. Maybe you decide you want to try some yoga. Now you’re researching yoga, from DIY video tutorials to in-house trainers to weekly yoga meetings. Again, you’re faced with a choice. The company that attracted you to yoga in the first place won’t reach you with the same ad again; rather, they need to have another ad that targets you now. Maybe you pick a weekly yoga meeting hosted by that company. You’re interested, so you need to research it some more. Ads, at this point, are either going to try to pull you away from that company, or are going to convince you to purchase the accessories you need for yoga, the membership to the club, or whatever else you need to be successful. One ad doesn’t fit all of these scenarios. Neither focuses on a single destination. If you have no idea how yoga can help with workplace stress, a homepage isn’t going to help; you want a landing page that is packed full of content about the stress-reduction benefits of yoga. You’re not ready to buy anything, so a page that focuses on selling you a membership isn’t going to go over well. Later, when you’re aware of the benefits of yoga and you’re looking to buy, a homepage isn’t going to be all that helpful. You want a landing page that tells you what kinds of products you need and what packages are on offer, so you can choose what you want to buy. Minimizing Distraction One of the core principles of landing page design is to minimize user choice. The more options a user has, the more likely the option they’re going to choose is to leave. People don’t like having to confront complicated scenarios. They don’t like having to problem solve in the middle of their problem solving. They simply want to be presented with a solution. Decision paralysis is a large part of this issue. Look at your homepage. What’s going on? You have links to service pages, links to blog posts, links to a contact page, links to social media. What is the user going to do? The point of a homepage is to give a user those options. The user knows your brand, they know your service, and you’re giving them a hub they can use to dig deeper into anything related to you. Maybe they want to read more of your blog content, so you have a blog link for them. Maybe they want to read more about a specific product, so they click a link to your product page. Maybe they want to read your company history, so they click the About link. A landing page knows what the user is coming there to see, and focuses itself solely around that destination. The product page, the about page, the blog post; these could be considered landing pages, if not for the trappings of a normal website around them. There’s very little reason to pay to bring people to your homepage. You should always be more focused than that. Know who you’re trying to reach, know what they’re trying to find, and provide that exact content for them in the form of a landing page. To do anything less could end up wasting your valuable ad dollars. The post Landing Page vs Homepage: Which One Should You Promote? appeared first on Growtraffic Blog.

How to Use YouTube and Instagram to Establish Authority

Social Media Examiner -

Want to be known as the expert in your field? Wondering how video on Instagram and YouTube can help? To explore how to build rapport with any audience using YouTube and Instagram Stories, I interview Amanda Horvath on the Social Media Marketing Podcast. Amanda is a video marketing strategist who helps people become thought leaders […] The post How to Use YouTube and Instagram to Establish Authority appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Create Personalized Content for Your Social Media Marketing

Social Media Examiner -

Want to generate more engagement, leads, and sales? Have you considered using personalized content in your marketing? In this article, you’ll find a plan and tools to help you create and deliver personalized content via social media platforms. Personalized Social Media Marketing: Why and How to Get Started Personalized marketing is a strategy where you […] The post How to Create Personalized Content for Your Social Media Marketing appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Total Server Solutions Achieves VMware Cloud Verified Status

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ATLANTA, GA – Total Server Solutions (TSS), a global Managed Services Provider, announced today it has achieved VMware Cloud Verified status. The Cloud Verified badge signals to customers that Total Server Solutions offers a service running on top of the complete VMware Cloud infrastructure. Through Cloud Verified partner services, customers attain access to the full set of VMware Cloud Infrastructure capabilities including integration and interoperability, cost optimization and flexibility. “VMware Cloud Verified status designates the top providers delivering the latest VMware Cloud infrastructure capabilities. Total Server Solutions is proud to be recognized as one of these leading organizations,” said Ryan DiRocco, CTO as TSS. “We have seen extensive enhancements to the VMware Cloud platform in the past few years and are excited to have these products as part of our core product offerings as we extend this platform to all of our world-wide data centers.” “Partners that are VMware Cloud Verified provide organizations with complete and advanced VMware Cloud technologies, along with interoperability across clouds for greater advantage for their customers’ businesses,” said Jim Aluotto, director, Cloud Provider Business, Americas Region, VMware. “Cloud Verified services delivered by VMware Cloud Providers can provide the efficiency, agility, and reliability inherent in cloud computing. We look forward to supporting Total Server Solutions as it empowers organizations with a simple and flexible path to the cloud.” VMware’s global network of more than 4,000 VMware Cloud Providers leverage VMware’s consistent cloud infrastructure to offer a wide array of services, provide geographic and industry specialization, and help customers meet complex regulatory requirements. Cloud Providers operating under the VMware Cloud Provider Program deliver individually tailored cloud solutions and services in more than 120 countries. To learn more about Total Server Solutions global platform of Cloud and Edge Services, please visit totalserversolutions.com. About Total Server Solutions Total Server Solutions is a global Managed Services Provider focused on connecting businesses to their customers and the data they need anywhere. The TSS global platform includes VMware Multi-Tenant Cloud, Veeam Data Protection, Colocation, Bare Metal Servers, Content Delivery Network (CDN) and a low latency, high-performance network enabling customers to securely and seamlessly move workloads anywhere in the world. Total Server Solutions is VMware Cloud Verified and is recognized as a VMware Enterprise Cloud Provider and a Veeam Platinum Partner.

Cologix Adds Third Data Center in Dallas

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DENVER, CO – Cologix, a network-neutral interconnection and hyperscale edge data center company, today announced it is adding a third data center in the renowned INFOMART Dallas building, the region’s preeminent carrier hotel. The new, state-of-the-art 13,200 SQF DAL3 data center will utilize Cologix’s existing Meet-Me-Room (MMR) and offer diverse fiber paths from customer cabinet/cage space to the MMR. DAL3 offers connections to Amazon Web Services® Direct Connect, Google Cloud Platform, Microsoft® Azure ExpressRoute, IBM Cloud and Oracle FastConnect. “With a strong telecom infrastructure and low costs of doing business, the Dallas market continues to grow and thrive driven primarily by enterprise customers and network providers,” said Bill Fathers, Chairman and CEO of Cologix. “Fortune 1,000 businesses need access to the best data center and interconnections available, especially when running latency-sensitive applications and accessing cloud compute services. Cologix provides diverse and unique access unparalleled in the industry. Our new interconnection hub will support growing consumer demand for speed and capacity to support immediate access to online banking and healthcare as well as on-demand gaming and apps like Fortnite and Lyft, video and live streaming with services like Netflix, YouTube and other content delivered to smartphones and other connected devices. In addition, Dallas is one of the U.S. metro markets where carriers are in a race to build 5G networks. ” Designed for 3kW/cabinet with higher-density configurations available up to 15 kW/cabinet, DAL3 will offer 2.25 MW of power. Located at 1950 North Stemmons Freeway, DAL3 will come on line Q1 2020 and joins the 35K SQF of the currently operational DAL1 and DAL2 facilities, bringing about 50K SQF of data center space to Dallas upon completion. Cologix’s MMR is highly connected to a diverse and unique group of more than 50 networks and direct on-ramps to all major hyperscale cloud providers. DAL3 is another example of Cologix’s continuous investment in the expansion of interconnection hubs. Located in region’s preeminent carrier hotel in one of the most vigorous communications markets in the United States, DAL3 at the Infomart hosts the largest number of carriers out of any single building in a 900-mile radius with more than 8,700 strands of fiber running into the facility. The combination of geographic location, available carriers, abundant fiber and MMR availability makes Cologix Dallas data centers the perfect site to colocate proximity-reliant or latency-sensitive applications. Other key features for DAL3 include: – Best available network neutral connectivity: 53 unique networks (including to Central America) in the Cologix-controlled Meet-Me-Room. Dual fiber entrances via vaults by individual carrier to Cologix vault. – Central location: Infomart Dallas with largest number of carriers in Southwest U.S. – Cooling Technology: Hot aisle containment with chilled water in-row cooling technology with N+1 chillers control data center. – Top certifications and security: SOC 1, SOC 2, HIPAA, and PCI-DSS compliant. About Cologix Inc. Cologix provides reliable, secure, scalable hyperscale edge data center solutions from 29 prime interconnection hubs and 5 hyperscale capacity facilities across 10 strategic North American markets. Over 1,600 leading network, managed services, cloud, media, content, financial services and enterprise customers trust Cologix to support their business critical infrastructure and connect them to customers, vendors and partners. Our dedicated, experienced local teams and scalable solutions enable us to provide industry-leading customer service and the ability to successfully support customers at the Internet’s new edge.

CoreSite Celebrates Virginia Data Center Grand Opening

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DENVER, CO – CoreSite Realty Corporation (NYSE:COR), a premier provider of secure, reliable, high-performance data center and interconnection solutions in major U.S. metropolitan areas, recently celebrated the Grand Opening of its newest colocation facility VA3 in Reston, Virginia. The CoreSite Reston campus and the continued growth and expansion with VA3 provides the CoreSite customer community with the immediate benefits of a rich ecosystem of natively deployed networks, cloud on-ramps, and solution partners. As of June 30, 2019, CoreSite’s Northern Virginia market was comprised of over 280 customers, which includes approximately 40 cloud providers, 170 enterprises, and 70 network providers. Additionally, the Fairfax County location allows CoreSite to serve the native base of enterprises, systems integrators, universities, and governmental agencies with the lowest latency to the largest public clouds. “The CoreSite Reston campus provides customers cloud connectivity and delivers the highest security and performance, low latency, with the lowest cost of cloud service utilization,” said Juan Font, CoreSite’s Senior Vice President, General Management. “With over 100MW of expected capacity for the Reston Campus Expansion, and the multi-cloud capabilities of the CoreSite platform, we are in a position to deliver the maximum degree of scale, operational flexibility and performance throughout the entire lifecycle of customers’ digital transformation journey,” said Font. “Thank you to Hunter Mill District Supervisor Hudgins and her team for her unwavering support of CoreSite over the years,” said Font. “We are also very thankful for the resourcefulness and commitment of the Fairfax Land Development Services team, as well as the Economic Development Authority.” “Additionally, our thanks to Bobbie Kilberg, President and CEO of the Northern Virginia Technology Council for joining and providing her perspective with the opening remarks and participating in the ribbon-cutting ceremony.” About CoreSite CoreSite Realty Corporation (NYSE:COR) delivers secure, reliable, high-performance data center and interconnection solutions to a growing customer ecosystem across eight key North American markets. More than 1,350 of the world’s leading enterprises, network operators, cloud providers, and supporting service providers choose CoreSite to connect, protect and optimize their performance-sensitive data, applications and computing workloads. Our scalable, flexible solutions and 450+ dedicated employees consistently deliver unmatched data center options — all of which leads to a best-in-class customer experience and lasting relationships. For more information, visit www.CoreSite.com.

Nexcess and Liquid Web Partner Together

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LANSING, MI – Liquid Web, the market leader in managed hosting and managed application services to SMBs, and Nexcess, the premier managed web hosting provider for eCommerce platforms have joined forces. With over 50 years of combined hosting experience, the move supports the company’s mission to dominate the Web Professional hosting market for SMBs. “This combination of companies demonstrates our commitment to be a leader in the Application hosting space and to deliver innovative solutions for the Web Professional customer that we are both focused on — designers, developers, site and store owners,” said Liquid Web CEO Jim Geiger. “Nexcess is the premier eCommerce hosting provider for SMBs, and this union gives them access to more scale and capital to continue growth for the long term. With the combination of our two companies and strong expertise in Magento, WordPress and WooCommerce, Liquid Web and Nexcess will now be able to further develop the product and open source platform capabilities that SMB customers and their developers have been asking for,” said Geiger. Current and future Liquid Web clients can expect to soon gain access to the technology and scalability of Nexcess Cloud. Likewise, present and future Nexcess clients will obtain access to Liquid Web plans and services. The companies will operate largely separate. Existing customers of Nexcess will not see changes in products or pricing, will not be migrated and they will continue to contact the Nexcess team they know today for service and support. Chris Wells, CEO, and founder at Nexcess, remains with the team and assumes a senior technology leadership role. A technology industry veteran, Carrie Wheeler, will lead the Managed Applications Business Unit which combines the Nexcess and Liquid Web focus on Magento, WooCommerce, WordPress solutions. “Nexcess has built a very successful business in Application hosting with a strong brand and a solid go-to-market strategy,” said Carrie Wheeler, EVP & General Manager, Managed Applications. “We sought Nexcess, recognizing that the combination of their leading Managed Magento platform with Liquid Web’s WooCommerce and WordPress focus allows us to combine products, services, capabilities and team to deliver the best hosting experience to SMBs and the designers, developers and agencies who create for them,” said Wheeler. This partnership expands the global reach of both companies, now with 650 employees, 11 data centers, and a full-service Application Web Hosting and Managed Cloud portfolio. Both companies look to expand their legacy of best-in-class support and customer service. Plans include more product development, event sponsorships, white papers, code contributions, and other ways to expand both companies’ footprint in the eCommerce community. About Liquid Web Liquid Web is an industry leader in applications hosting, managed hosting and cloud services known for its high-performance services and exceptional customer support. With over 30,000 customers spanning 150 countries, the company has a world-class team, global data centers and an expert group of 24/7/365 solution engineers. The company has been recognized among INC Magazine’s 5000 Fastest Growing Companies for twelve years. With over 1 million sites under management, they have the scale in support, leadership, and financial backing to deliver the best customer experience in the hosting industry. About Nexcess New technology comes with a promise. Almost 20 years ago, from a small garage in Michigan, one man set out to fulfill that promise: to become a hosting provider that empowers clients to create and grow the businesses they want. Now, from its Southfield, Michigan headquarters, Nexcess holds data centers around the world that offer the best in terms of performance, reliability, and control. By embracing complexity, providing stability, and working with clients, partners, and team members, Nexcess has managed to create innovations that have changed the face of web hosting support and management forever.

Equinix Expands into Mexico With Acquisition of Three Axtel Data Centers

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REDWOOD CITY, CA – Equinix, Inc. (Nasdaq: EQIX), the global interconnection and data center company, today announced it has entered into an agreement with Axtel S.A.B. de C.V. (BMV: AXTELCPO) to acquire three data centers that serve the Mexico City and Monterrey metro areas of Mexico for US$175 million in an all-cash transaction. The three facilities generated approximately $21 million of revenues in the 12 months ending December 31, 2018, with an EBITDA margin profile accretive to the Equinix business. The acquisition is expected to close in Q1 2020, subject to customary closing conditions including regulatory approval. The addition of these three facilities in two strategic technology metros in Mexico is part of Equinix’s strategy of extending its global leadership into attractive large-growth markets. This acquisition, when combined with the previous acquisitions of key traffic hubs in Dallas (Infomart) and Miami (NAP of the Americas), will further strengthen Equinix’s global platform by increasing interconnection between North, Central and South America. The three data centers will add approximately 115,000 square feet of colocation space to the Equinix International Business Exchange (IBX®) data center portfolio. Given the power capacity of these three sites, this transaction will make Equinix one of the largest network-neutral data center operators in Mexico. Including current expansion projects, Equinix has invested more than $500 million in its Latin American operations including Brazil, Colombia and now Mexico. The expansion will support the important role Equinix plays in helping companies evolve from traditional businesses to digital businesses by globally interconnecting the people, locations, cloud services and data that are critical to their operations. Current and future customers will have the opportunity to operate on an expanded global interconnection platform to process, store and distribute larger volumes of latency-sensitive data and applications at the digital edge, closer to end-users and local markets. About Equinix Equinix, Inc. (Nasdaq: EQIX) connects the world’s leading businesses to their customers, employees and partners inside the most-interconnected data centers. On this global platform for digital business, companies come together across more than 50 markets on five continents to reach everywhere, interconnect everyone and integrate everything they need to create their digital futures.

Oracle and VMware Partner to Support Customers’ Hybrid Cloud Strategies

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SAN FRANCISCO, CA – Oracle (NYSE: ORCL) and VMware, Inc. (NYSE: VMW), announced an expanded partnership to help customers leverage the companies’ enterprise software and cloud solutions to make the move to the cloud. Under this new partnership, customers will be able to support their hybrid cloud strategies by running VMware Cloud Foundation on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. With this new solution, customers will be able to easily migrate VMware vSphere workloads to Oracle’s Generation 2 Cloud Infrastructure and take advantage of consistent infrastructure and operations. As a part of this partnership, Oracle will also provide technical support for Oracle software running in VMware environments both in customer on-premise data centers and Oracle-certified cloud environments. “As more of our customers make the move to cloud, they’re looking for a superior VMware experience. We are excited that Oracle Cloud customers will be able to run VMware workloads in Oracle Cloud and retain VMware administrative access,” said Don Johnson, executive vice president, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. “This is made possible by Layer 2 networking in the cloud and our bare metal service. Customers will be able to extend existing VMware investments, processes, and tools while benefitting from the security and performance of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.” “VMware is delighted that for the first time, Oracle will officially offer technical support for Oracle products running on VMware. This is a win-win for customers,” said Sanjay Poonen, chief operating officer, customer operations, VMware. “We’re also happy to welcome Oracle to the VMware Cloud Provider Program, which will allow them to migrate and manage workloads running on VMware Cloud Foundation in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.” With this announcement, Oracle becomes a partner in the VMware Cloud Provider Program and Oracle Cloud VMware Solution will be sold by Oracle and its partners. The solution will be based on VMware Cloud Foundation and will deliver a full stack software-defined data center (SDDC) including VMware vSphere, NSX, and vSAN. Through consistent infrastructure and operations, customers will be able to migrate and modernize applications, seamlessly moving workloads between on-premise environments and Oracle Cloud. Customers will be able to easily use Oracle services, such as Oracle Autonomous Database, Oracle Exadata Cloud Service and Oracle Database Cloud, which run in the same cloud data centers, on the same networks, with a consistent portal and APIs. Customers will also be able to leverage Oracle’s rapidly expanding footprint of global regions to scale globally without needing to establish their own data centers. Oracle will provide administrative access to the underlying physical servers, enabling a level of control previously only possible on premise, and customers will be able to use VMware vCenter to manage both their on-premise clusters and Oracle Cloud-based SDDCs through a single pane of glass. Oracle will also provide first line technical support for this solution. To learn more about the offering visit: https://www.oracle.com/cloud/VMware About Oracle The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at oracle.com. About VMware VMware software powers the world’s complex digital infrastructure. The company’s cloud, networking and security, and digital workspace offerings provide a dynamic and efficient digital foundation to customers globally, aided by an extensive ecosystem of partners. Headquartered in Palo Alto, California, VMware is committed to being a force for good, from its breakthrough innovations to its global impact. For more information, please visit https://www.vmware.com/company.html.

TikTok Analytics: What Marketers Need to Know

Social Media Examiner -

Are you using TikTok? Wondering how to measure the results of your TikTok marketing efforts? In this article, you’ll learn more about TikTok analytics. #1: Switch to a TikTok Pro Account to Access TikTok Analytics TikTok recently launched a native analytics tool for Pro accounts, which are similar to Instagram Creator accounts. TikTok’s analytics dashboard […] The post TikTok Analytics: What Marketers Need to Know appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Retarget Ads to Engaged Instagram and Facebook Fans

Social Media Examiner -

Want more sales from your Facebook and Instagram marketing? Have you considered retargeting people who already engage with you? In this article, you’ll learn how to create a Facebook and Instagram ad campaign to target people who have engaged with your Facebook and Instagram content. Why Engagement Remarketing Ad Campaigns Work Before diving into how […] The post How to Retarget Ads to Engaged Instagram and Facebook Fans appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

Instagram Stories Launches New Creative Features

Social Media Examiner -

Welcome to this week’s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week’s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore the new Create mode for Instagram Stories Camera, the new Instagram app Threads, and more with special […] The post Instagram Stories Launches New Creative Features appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Customize Facebook Ads Based on Customer Awareness Principles

Social Media Examiner -

Looking for a proven strategy to create Facebook ads? Wondering how to deliver different Facebook ads based on peoples’ familiarity with your business? To explore how to customize Facebook ads based on consumer awareness of your brand, I interview Ralph Burns on the Social Media Marketing Podcast. Ralph is the founder of Tier 11, an […] The post How to Customize Facebook Ads Based on Customer Awareness Principles appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

How to Find the Ideal Cost Per Action on Google Ads

Grow Traffic Blog -

There are a ton of different acronyms and abbreviations involved in paid advertising, and one of the most important is CPA, or Cost Per Action. CPA is a metric that measures how much an action costs. So if you’re paying to get new email subscribers, you’d be calculating the cost per subscriber. If you’re paying to get new product sales, it’s the cost per sale. If you’re paying to get new social media followers, it’s simply the cost of a new follower. A question I’m frequently asked is this: What is the ideal cost per action? The answer is, as low as possible, and I’ll tell you why. CPA As the Better Metric One thing you’ve probably seen before is the concept of penny clicks. Penny clicks are clicks, in CPC marketing, where the cost per click is only a single penny, which is typically about the lowest you can get. Some ad networks will let you get even lower, where a fraction of a penny gets you a click, but that’s typically only for ad networks that operate in a currency that’s weaker than the USD. You’ve probably also seen articles like this one about why penny clicks typically suck. If you’re not familiar with the argument, it’s quite simple. When the action you’re seeking is a click, it’s easy to get. If you pay $1 and get 100 clicks, that seems great. Then you look at your analytics. What did those clicks get you? Most of the time, those clicks got you nothing.  Out of those 100 clicks, 50 of them bounced immediately. Of the remaining 50, 40 of them lingered on the page for maybe 10 seconds and then left, without scrolling or clicking on anything. With only 10 clicks remaining, you look, and none of them do anything. Some might scroll, one of them might click a second page, but none of them do anything beyond that. Penny clicks don’t convert. Penny clicks don’t subscribe to mailing lists. Penny clicks don’t buy products. The majority of the time, penny clicks are either bots are people who are paid to click ads, and are paid by the volume of ads, not by any engagement afterwards. In short, it’s usually basically just click fraud. This is why there’s a widespread caution against penny clicks. There’s an “ideal” cost per click, somewhere significantly higher than one cent. The exact actual ideal cost per click might be 30 cents, or 50 cents, or $1, depending on the industry and the audience. The thing is, that’s for CPC, not CPA. CPA is a better metric, because the action is something you care about. Instead of a click – which is basically valueless if it doesn’t lead to anything further – your action is something tangible. Something that has real value to you. A new social media follower is valuable. A new newsletter subscriber is valuable. A new customer is extremely valuable. These actions are important enough that you can even assign a monetary value to them if you want. Since the A in CPA is an action you care about and that has value, the C, or Cost for that action, can be as low as you can push it. If you get penny actions, well, you’re probably doing pretty well for yourself. Imagine running ads where you pay one single penny for every new product sale you make. You’d be ecstatic! Your sales team would throw a party because they found the platonic ideal of marketing. Thus, the ideal CPA is as close to nothing as you can get it. Now, it’s possible that with some kind of actions, you still run into the click problem. For example, social media followers might not be valuable to you if they aren’t qualified followers. A lot of the shady third party follower sellers are selling bots or people in networks that exist only to follow pages, and they don’t do anything afterward. So you do still need to pay attention to the quality of the action you’re getting. After all, that action does still need value. Calculating CPA How should you actually go about calculating your cost per action? Typically, you need to harvest some segmented data and do a little math. Here are your considerations. First of all, the basic CPA calculation is very simple. Take the total cost of your marketing efforts in a given time, such as a week, a month, or the duration of a specific campaign. Then find the total number of new actions you received during that same duration. Cost per Action, so take the total cost and divide it by the number of actions, to receive the cost per action. For example, let’s say you have a spring ad campaign that you spend $1,000 on over the course of a month. You got 500 new subscribers. Divide 1,000 by 500 to get 2. That’s $2 per 1 subscriber, so a CPA of $1. Simple, right? Now you have to remember that you rarely have one single CPA. You can calculate one CPA for everything you’ve done across an entire quarter, if you want, but it’s not likely to be a very useful number. No, you need to segment your data down. First, figure out different actions that have value to you. New social media followers, new newsletter subscribers, new customers, new leads; these can all be valuable actions that have different costs associated with them. Second, figure out the different channels you’re using. This is relatively easy; just look at what ads you’re paying for. One business might be paying for Facebook ads, Google ads, Twitter ads, and ads on a local TV affiliate. Now you have an array. You have combinations of each of these factors you can calculate a unique CPA for. For example, you have all of these calculations: Cost per social media follower from Facebook ads. Cost per newsletter subscriber from Twitter ads. Cost per new customer from TV ads. Cost per social media follower from Google ads. And so on. Each combination of action and channel is a unique CPA. You can get even more granular. Let’s say you’re running three different ad campaigns on Facebook. One is a standard long-running content campaign, one is a campaign focused on some timely piece of news, and one is a seasonal campaign. All three of those can have their own CPAs. You have to decide how granular you want your data. I recommend getting as granular as possible, and then using aggregate data when you want a broader look at your overview.  This gives you the best of both worlds. And, of course, the CPA for each channel and each action can be improved in its own ways. The methods you use to optimize for newsletter subscribers will be different than the ones you use for getting new social followers, which will be different than your sales pushes to get new leads. The more granular your data, the more levers you have to pull to optimize. More options means more testing, more testing means more optimization, and more optimization means lower costs per action. Optimizing for Lower CPAs Now, I know I said that a lower cost per action is better, but that’s not entirely true. You need to find the right balance between a low CPA and a high action volume. Getting $0.01 per action doesn’t help you if you only get one new lead out of it. There will be a sweet spot between getting more actions and getting cheaper actions. Thankfully, pretty much all of the methods you have for lowering the cost per action are also was to improve the quality of those actions, and as such aren’t likely to make your number of actions drop significantly. Focus on improving audience targeting. The accuracy of the audience you’re targeting is important for lowering costs. Platforms like Facebook and Google have a ton of different ways to optimize your audience, from demographics to interest targeting to geographic targeting. You need to figure out the key attributes of the people you’re trying to reach, and then optimize your targeting to reach only those people. The fewer non-interested people in the audience, the less wasted money you have in your quest for actions. Segment your audience for multiple optimization routes. Remember that even though you might be able to consider that you have one “audience”, you actually have many smaller audiences. A company producing products for new mothers might have an audience of young mothers, an audience of older mothers, an audience of mothers of boys, and audience of mothers of girls, and so on. Segmenting your audience as narrowly as possible means you can optimize your ad experiences that much more for those people. Improve your landing page experience. When a user clicks on your ad, what faces them? Are they on your home page? A blog post? A product page? A landing page? Optimizing your landing page experience is a crucial part of lowering your costs. Remove obstacles that distract users who land on the page. Make the page clear and its goal as focused as possible. Make sure the page loads quickly and works on every platform. There are a bunch of levers you can pull here too. Improve your conversion process. If the user is interested in converting, what stops them? Some aspects of your conversion process can be smoothed out to improve customer flow. Are you asking for too much information on a subscriber form? Do you lack the normal trust indicators for a payment page? Are you asking for sensitive information without using SSL? Identify reasons a user might find to stop the purchase process and smooth them out. Track multiple goals for a single click. Just because a user clicks on an ad you aim at new subscribers doesn’t mean it has to stop at measuring new subscribers. Some of those people might go on to complete other actions as well, and you can calculate them in different parts of your cost equations. Pay attention to quality score on platforms that use it. Both Facebook and Google have quality scores they maintain. These scores serve as an indicator of various metrics – which metrics specifically depends on the platform – and can affect the costs and conversion rates for your ads. You want to learn the factors that go into them, monitor them to see where you stand, and work to improve them as you run more ads. Rotate ads when they start to get stale. Ads lose their effectiveness over time, as people start to see the more and more, and as they start trying to reach people with less and less engagement. This is when you should rotate your ads. Change the copy, change the value proposition, change the targeting, whatever, just rotate them. Make sure there’s generally something fresh and new for people to engage with for maximum value. Always be testing. One thing you should simply never stop is testing. Always have variations on different ads running, and calculate your CPA for each variation. This gives you an idea of which ads and which changes are performing well, and how you can improve other ads as you go. And, of course, your ideas. Those of you who are experienced in CPA improvements, what have you found most effective? Share with the class and you may end up cited in a future post! The post How to Find the Ideal Cost Per Action on Google Ads appeared first on Growtraffic Blog.

How to Get Started With TikTok: A Guide for Marketers

Social Media Examiner -

Thinking of putting your business on TikTok? Wondering how other brands are using TikTok successfully? In this article, you’ll discover how to create TikTok video and find examples to inspire you to use TikTok in your own marketing. Why Consider TikTok? TikTok’s growth is fascinating on many levels. For starters, it’s the first major social […] The post How to Get Started With TikTok: A Guide for Marketers appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

5 Ways to Humanize Your Instagram Business Account

Social Media Examiner -

Want to make your business more memorable on Instagram? Looking for tips to boost brand loyalty with your audience? In this article, you’ll discover five tips to ensure your Instagram account stands out. #1: Give Your Instagram Copy Personality When developing an Instagram business profile, most companies focus on the visual aspects of their brand. […] The post 5 Ways to Humanize Your Instagram Business Account appeared first on Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner.

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